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6th Breakout Sessions
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This blog contains all breakout session presentations from the 6th annual conference, January 4-7, 2009 in Anaheim CA. Feel free to share this with colleagues, and post comments on the blog.

 

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Top tags: Curriculum  Outreach  Faculty Development  Linking K-16  Diverse Populations  Econ Dev Agencies  Leadership  Measuring  Fundraising  Knox  Entrepreneurial Leadership  Louis Lautman  millionaire  the yes movie  young entrepreneur 

Flexible Scheduling for Entrepreneurs at Community College

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Flexible Scheduling for Entrepreneurs at Community College

 

Guide Description: 

Today’s entrepreneurs need to have a presence on the web, but often have little time for “teaching themselves” and a small budget for “hiring to have it done.”  Parkland Community College offers web design coursework that has been modularized to provide more flexible scheduling options for busy entrepreneurs.

 

Full Description:   

As an instructor in the web design program at Parkland Community College, I am involved in entrepreneurship education from many different angles: teaching entrepreneurial tools like how to create a website, nurturing students to think creatively, and constantly exploring new ideas in curriculum development.

 

With all of this entrepreneurial energy around, flexible course delivery options are vital. The diverse population at a community college often includes adults who are working full-time and unable to devote enough time to complete the projects involved in a 3-hour course.  To make learning course content more flexible, I took the content of the introductory 3-hour web design course and created three, 1-hour courses that cover the same material so busy students can  learn the material over the course of more than one semester. It is possible to enroll in the 1-hour courses anytime before midterm of the semester. To accommodate online students needing the opportunity to occasionally meet in person, an open classroom time is available a few hours each week when students can “walk in” and get individualized help from the instructor in a lab environment. When space is available, interested students are also invited to attend lecture sessions that are scheduled in the campus sections of the 3-hour course. In the spring semester of this school year, more options are being added with the possibility of 3-4 hour blocks of lecture material being presented several times during the semester in a lab environment that allows hands-on activity. Handouts and details of implementing this method will be given.
 

Ruthann Whobrey, Associate Professor, Parkland College, IL

Tags:  Curriculum 

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Sharing Success: A Student Business Incubator

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Sharing Success: A Student Business Incubator

Guide Description:
Springfield Technical Community College's Student Business Incubator has been operational for ten years. This session will explore the various stages of building and expanding a successful student business incubator; feasibility, funding, staffing, facility, building institutional support, academic value exchange, and developing policies and procedures.

Full Description:

Springfield Technical Community College's Student Business Incubator has been operational for ten years. This session will explore the various stages of building a successful student business incubator, through experiences from the field. Attendees will learn about feasibility, funding, staffing, facility, building institutional support, recognizing academic value, and developing policy and procedures. Attendee participation through questions and answers will be encouraged. Handouts will include a "how-to" guide for building a student business incubator.
Attendees will leave the session with a comprehensive understanding of the components to create a student business incubator on a community college campus. 

Diane Sabato, Director, Entrepreneurial Institute, Springfield Technical Community College, MA
Thomas A. Goodrow, Founder, National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship, Vice President, Economic and Business Development, Springfield Technical Community College, MA

Tags:  Diverse Populations 

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True Community Collaboration – Supporting a Business Resource Community Project

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008

True Community Collaboration – Supporting a Business Resource Community Project

Guide Description:
This session describes what a community can do when funding for traditional business resource programs is scarce or unavailable. You will hear how community partners consisting of Workforce, Community College and Chamber of Commerce pulled together minimal resources and created a successful Business Resource Center to serve a growing area.

 

Full Description:
This presentation will present the history of the Central Texas Business Resource Center community project and its contributions to the Greater Killeen and Fort Hood TX Region. Best practices will be shared with attendees.

In early 2000, the Texas Center for Women’s Business Enterprise (TxCWBE) entered into an agreement with the Killeen Workforce Center (KWC), with support from the Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce (GKCC) and Central Texas College (CTC) (collectively, “the Contributors”). The agreement encompassed the management and staffing of the Central Texas Business Resource Center (the BRC). TxCWBE was able to enter into this agreement as a result of secured funding from the Small Business Administration’s Office of Women’s Business Ownership to serve the Bell County area.

On January the following year, TxCWBE’s Board of Directors elected to discontinue its services through the BRC due to additional SBA requirements for matching funds to sustain the grant and new payment/reimbursement methods.

Due to the sudden decision of TxCWBE to no longer fund or manage the BRC, main supporters of the BRC decided they can contribute funds to keep its programs functional.

Assisting businesses is a goal that fits into the organizational structure for most communities:

The Workforce System finds it attractive in order to increase job creation among small companies.

Community College finds it attractive because new employees and business owners need additional training and education, and these businesses most certainly will serve as a source for instructors.

Chamber of Commerce finds it attractive because of the potential growth in its membership.

Economic Development Corporations find it attractive in order to build businesses in the area that will serve as suppliers and/or support businesses to larger businesses that are being recruited for relocation.

Marcus Carr, Director, Central Texas Business Resource Center, TX

Diane Drussell, Programs Coordinator, Central Texas Business Resource Center, TX

Susan Kamas, Workforce Board Executive Director, Workforce Solutions of Central Texas, TX

Jerry Haisler, Workforce Center Director, Workforce Solutions of Central Texas, TX

Dr. John Frith, Chair, Business Administration & Paralegal Department, Central Texas College, TX

John Crutchfield, President/CEO, Greater Killeen Chamber of Commerce, TX

Tags:  Econ Dev Agencies 

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Refining the Definition, Fifth Generation of American Community Colleges: A Two-Phase Perspective from The Field

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Refining the Definition, Fifth Generation of American Community Colleges: A Two-Phase Perspective from The Field

 

Guide Description: 

This study was an examination of the contemporary definition of the American Community College. The research highlighted: (1) the historical overview of the first four generations of the American Community College; (2) the contemporary mission controversy; (3) new mission focus for community college; and (4) a refined definition for the fifth generation of the American Community College. This two-phase qualitative research analysis defined the fifth generation of community colleges and examined the magnitude of entrepreneurial activities in public community colleges throughout the United States using a stratified sample method.

 

Full Description: 
This study was an examination of the contemporary definition of the American Community College. The research highlighted: (1) the historical overview of the first four generations of the American Community College; (2) the contemporary mission controversy; (3) new mission focus for community college; and (4) a refined definition for the fifth generation of the American Community College. This two-phase qualitative research analysis defined the fifth generation of community colleges and examined the magnitude of entrepreneurial activities in public community colleges throughout the United States using a stratified sample method. Constituent groups were selected from three institutional types (rural, suburban, and urban) from Maryland community colleges. A total of eight community colleges (three rural, three suburban, and two urban institutions) were selected with 34 constituents participating in this study. Additionally, this study analyzed institutional documents and websites from 300 of the 979 public community colleges for evidence of entrepreneurial activities (AACC, 2006). The responses from the constituent groups and evaluation of institutional documents revealed a mission shift and supported our argument for a refined description of the mission focus of the next generation of community colleges to be entrepreneurial.
 

Dr. Christine Johnson McPhail, Program Coordinator, Community College Leadership Doctoral Program, Morgan State University, MD

Dr. Kriesta L. Watson, Senior Research Associate, Community College Leadership Doctoral Program, Morgan State University, MD
 

Abstract

 

 
This study was an examination of the contemporary definition of the American Community College. The research highlighted: (1) the historical overview of the first four generations of the American Community College; (2) the contemporary mission controversy; (3) new mission focus for community college; and (4) a refined definition for the fifth generation of the American Community College. This two-phase qualitative research analysis defined the fifth generation of community colleges and examined the magnitude of entrepreneurial activities in public community colleges throughout the United States using a stratified sample method. Constituent groups were selected from three institutional types (rural, suburban, and urban) from Maryland community colleges. A total of eight community colleges (three rural, three suburban, and two urban institutions) were selected with 34 constituents participating in this study. Additionally, this study analyzed institutional documents and websites from 300 of the 979 public community colleges for evidence of entrepreneurial activities (AACC, 2006). The responses from the constituent groups and evaluation of institutional documents revealed a mission shift and supported our argument for a refined description of the mission focus of the next generation of community colleges to be entrepreneurial.

 

a. Objectives or Purposes

 

This study was an examination of the contemporary definition of the American Community College. Session participants will be engaged in an intense conversation about the controversial mission description of the comprehensive community college. To help raise awareness of the scope of the controversy, the paper will cover recent research highlighting: (1) the historical overview of the first four generations of the community college; (2) the contemporary mission controversy; (3) new mission focus for community college; and (4) a refined definition of the fifth generation of the American Community College with an examination of entrepreneurial activities.

 

Three central research questions guided this study: How do community college constituent groups describe the next generation of the American Community College? To what extent are community colleges involved in entrepreneurial activities and what is the evidence that supports this entrepreneurial involvement?

 

Currently, many community colleges are unable to measure the mission direction because they are not able to articulate a clear definition of the direction or mission focus. In addition, current descriptions do not clearly align with the direction of the institution. Meaningful discussions concerning the next generation of community colleges require a description that more accurately describes the various functions of the community college. The current definition of comprehensive community colleges has limitations because it does not capture the unique issues facing the contemporary community college. This paper is designed to re-examine the mission with the intent of identifying a more representative mission definition—one that will assist community colleges in their efforts to effectively articulate their services and focus to the communities that they serve.

 

b. Perspectives or Theoretical Framework

 

This study builds upon the Deegan and Tillery’s (1985) Community College Generational Model (DTCCGM) and is designed to explore contemporary perspectives of the mission focus of the American Community College. Using the central research question as a focal point, constituent groups such as executives, administrators, faculty, and students were queried on their perspectives of Deegan and Tillery’s (1985) six identified variables such as mission, students, curriculum, support services, facilities, and relationships with schools, university, government, and private sector. Additionally, using the definitions based on the Schumpeter’s (1934) Model of Entrepreneurship (products, production methods, markets, forms of organization, and forms of leadership), the institutional websites and documents were examined for evidence of entrepreneurial activities. The researchers argue that the current description, comprehensive community college, no longer describes the functions of the contemporary community college. The paper will increase session participants’ awareness of the current status and future role of the American Community College. Based on our findings, the researchers engage the participants in a conversation and refine the definition of the fifth generation of American Community Colleges.

 

According to Deegan and Tillery (1985), the community college sector has experienced four generations of development: high school extension, junior college, community college, and comprehensive community college. However, the Deegan and Tillery (1985) classifications left the fifth generation undefined. This two-phase qualitative research analysis presents the fifth generation of community colleges with an examination of entrepreneurial activities using Schumpeter (1934) model of entrepreneurship.

 

c. Methods, Techniques, or Modes of Inquiry

 

This qualitative research design used a two-phase method which included multi-case, multi-site methodology and content analysis of institutional documents. A qualitative research approach was employed due to the phenomenon (American Community Colleges) being studied through the eyes of the constituent groups. In addition, qualitative research methodology was selected because of its practicality, usefulness, and convenience (Nachimias, 2000; Patton, 1980; Reinhaz, 1992; Strauss & Corbin, 1990). A multi-case, multi-site design strengthened the validity and reliability of the results of the case study method by allowing the researchers to conduct pattern-matching among the constituent groups and institutions (Tellis, 1997; Yin, 2003).

 

Yin (2003) outlined five key steps for case study methodology. These steps included developing theory; selecting cases and designing data collection protocols; conducting case studies; and writing individual case reports. The researchers used Yin approach to conduct this investigation. The main variables investigated were mission, students, curriculum, support services, facilities, and relationships with schools, university, government, and private sector.

 

Content analysis was employed in order evaluate institutional websites and documents such as leadership (i.e. President’s, Chancellor’s, Provosts or CEO’s), mission and vision statements. Using the definitions based on the Schumpeter’s (1934) Model of Entrepreneurship (products, production methods, markets, forms of organization, and forms of leadership), the institutional websites and documents were examined for evidence of entrepreneurial activities based on four regions (Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, and Southwest) and were coded accordingly.

 

Sample

Four constituent groups -- executives, administrators, faculty, and students -- were represented as constituents in this research study. Constituent groups were selected from three institutional types (rural, suburban, and urban) from Maryland community colleges. A total of eight community colleges (three rural, three suburban, and two urban institutions) were selected with 34 constituents participating in the study.

 

Four regions - Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, and Southwest – were assigned to 300 of the 979 public community colleges in United States for this phase of the study for evidence of entrepreneurial activities (AACC, 2006) using stratified sampling.

 

Data Collection

Yin (1994) outlined a case study protocol which   included “overview of the project (project objectives and case study issues), field procedures (credentials and access to sites), questions (specific questions that the investigator must keep in mind during data collection), and guide for the report (outline and format for the case study report)” (p. 69). This research study followed this protocol and was implemented through relevant trainings of all interviewers.

 

Based on the sample size of 300, 75 institutions were assigned to each of the four regions. Then, evidence of entrepreneurial activity (new products, production methods, markets, forms of organization, and forms of leadership) using institutional documents was examined such as websites that included leadership, mission, and vision statements. Manifest and latent coding was utilized in order to classify the data by entrepreneurial activity. Once coded, the data was then computed manually and electronically for an analysis by region and entrepreneurial activity.

 

d. Data Sources or Evidence

 

Interviews

Interviewers used face-to-face, one-on-one structured interviews with each participant at a prearranged time; a one-day visit was made to each site in the fall of 2003 and 2004. During these site visits, interviews were conducted with various constituent groups. The interviews ranged from 30 minutes to 90 minutes in length (Creswell, 2003; Yin, 2003).

 

Consistent with the conceptual framework, constituents were asked to focus their comments on the future of community colleges. Specifically, constituents shared their perspectives on six variables of the fifth generation of community colleges: (a) mission, (b) students, (c) curriculum, (d) support services, (e) facilities and (f) external relationships. During each interview, constituents were given an interview questionnaire to assist with the questioning for the interviews. Each interviewer followed these questions and did not deviate from the questions outlined on the instrument.

 

Data Coding and Analysis

After interviews were conducted, the interview notes and tapes were transcribed. Each transcription was then saved using Microsoft Word in a rich text format, in order for the data to be inputted into the qualitative research software, Altas.ti. This software improved the researchers’ ability to enhance data coding and analyses.

 

Atlas.ti, qualitative research software, assisted with the data analyses which were initially competed manually. This software provided a uniform and technical method for coding interview transcriptions. In addition, this software provided useful resources such as a convenient manner in which to code the data from the transcripts, identify quotes, and perform frequency charts (Yin, 2003).

 

The coding process also included an assessment by institutional type, constituent group or entrepreneurial activity in order to improve the study’s ability in searching for patterns and themes within a particular setting or across cases and regions (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994; Patton, 1990; Yin, 2003). Case analysis provided a more comprehensive, systematic, and in-depth analysis (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994). The cross case analysis was based on institutional types (suburban, suburban, and urban) and constituents (executives, administrators, faculty, and students) and region and entrepreneurial activities using the six identifiable themes.

 

The unit of analysis was sentences and words from interview notes, institutional documents, and transcriptions. The classifications were then re-evaluated for themes and sub-themes within each variable for further narrowing and included iterative processes (Babbie, 1983; Creswell, 2003). Themes were organized based on Deegan and Tillery and Schumpeter’s classifications and further segregated to include emerging themes for mission, student, curriculum, support services, facilities and external relationships as well as new products, production methods, markets, forms of organization, and forms of leadership.

 

e. Results and / or Conclusions / Point of View

 

Since participants told us in the first phase that community colleges were becoming more entrepreneurial, we probed further for evidence of entrepreneurial activity by examining institutional documents from community college leadership, mission, and vision statements during the second phase. Research findings from the second phase of the study were presented by entrepreneurial activity and region (northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest) within United States. Using Schumpeter’s (1934) Model of Entrepreneurship, institutional documents were assessed for entrepreneurial activity (new products, production methods, markets, forms of organization, and forms of leadership). The findings in this study highlighted that contemporary community colleges’ engagement in entrepreneurial activities demonstrated an investment in the areas of new products, production methods, and markets as well as new forms of organization and leadership.  

 

For example, community colleges in the northwest region appeared to have the highest indication of entrepreneurial activity in the area of new forms of leadership with a stronger focus on new product development. Most of the community colleges in the region had leadership and vision statements that acknowledged entrepreneurial activities than any other region. In contrast, we found that most of the community colleges throughout the southeast region did not have vision statements. Consequently, in the southeast region, entrepreneurial activities of new products were referenced the most in leadership and mission statements. Finally, in the southwest region, community colleges demonstrated higher amounts of entrepreneurial activity especially as evidenced by their mission statements. In particular, they reached out to attract new markets by going after minority and older students followed by continued interest in new product development such as curriculum innovation, intellectual property, expansion in delivery services, etc.

 

The research findings demonstrated the ever-evolving mission of community colleges shifting from comprehensiveness to an entrepreneurial focus. For example, the concept of the comprehensive community college could not illustrate the interdependence of internal and external relationships required to address issues such as articulation, transfer, diversity of population, budget and finance, accountability, productivity, and the overall academic success of students. There is a need to have a concept of the role of the community colleges that illustrates how it embraces underlying community and national trends or identify and responds to ever-changing societal needs. For example, a surprising finding for this study was that constituents believed that colleges must become more enterprising and develop stronger focus on relationship building (which will become the rule instead of the exception). The fact that some constituents eloquently expressed the need for community colleges to become more concerned about the academic success of all learners; engagement of the students and redefined roles of faculty may reveal another constraint of the current comprehensive community college concept. Another compelling finding was that all constituents stated external relationships as fundamental to the image of the community college; viewing relationships with business and government as key to future organizational success.

 

The findings also clearly revealed how technology may change the way community colleges fulfill their mission (O’Banion, 2000; Oblinger, 2003). An advantage of working with a variety of constituent groups in the process of defining the role of community colleges might be the identification of subgroups that have distinct perceptions about the definitions.

 

While these results may not be representative of the perspectives of all constituent groups, it supports the need for further investigation of a more descriptive definition of community colleges. Based on the review of the literature and findings, we argue that the fifth generation of community colleges may be classified as the Entrepreneurial Community College focusing on “new products, new production methods, new markets, and new forms of organizations” with a strong thrust towards the external constituent and environment (Schumpeter, 1934).

 

A New Name, New Direction, and The Next Generation

It is evident that contemporary community colleges are engaged in a multiplicity of functions. This research revealed that the roles and functions of the community college extend beyond the current comprehensive community college classification. Analysis of the data identified six key features for the Entrepreneurial Community College mission focus (accessibility, accountability, affordability, and diversity (academically, ethnically, culturally, etc.)) and entrepreneurial activities (new products, new production methods, new markets, and new forms of organizations). These areas are intricately connected to contemporary societal issues found in the communities served by these community colleges.

 

Although the concept of the comprehensive community college explains the magnitude of the functions of the community college, it falls short of the groupings of intimacy and spontaneity of the community college’s relationship within its local environment. Some of the responses from the constituents and institutional documents in this study can be explained within the context of the comprehensive community college classification. However, this research draws an extended inference from the findings and suggests that the mission focus of the next generation of community colleges can best be explained from an entrepreneurial context. This research proposes that the term, Entrepreneurial Community College, presents an opportunity to address and respond to the changing constituent needs of future community colleges.

 

f. Educational or Scientific Importance of the Study

 

Despite the wide-spread interest and concern, what counts as an accurate description of the contemporary generation of community colleges remains inadequately specified in the research undertaken since Deegan and Tillery’s (1985) seminal study. Accurately defining and describing the mission of America’s community colleges is an increasingly important task for community colleges leaders and for those making policy decisions about community colleges. Deegan and Tillery documented four generations of the community college by examining the mission and the sector’s evolution. The four generations included high school extension, 1900-1930; junior college, 1930-1950; community college, 1950-1970; and comprehensive community college, 1970 to Mid-1980s. If institutional change is ever-presented—as evident by characteristics of the modern community college—the important issue is how do community colleges accurately describe the next generation of community colleges?

 

Many changes have taken place since the missions of community colleges were comprehensively studied and evaluated, chief of which is that no clear definition of the contemporary mission of community colleges has emerged due to the ambiguity and confusion regarding the comprehensive mission. Many have speculated about the mission function and composition which have included perspectives on the problems and challenges of the fourth generation (Brint & Karabel, 1989, 1995; Cohen and Brawer, 1996; Deegan & Tillery, 1985; Dougherty, 2001; Levin, 2001; McCartan, 1983; Reitano, 1998; Smith, 1995). Specifically, the comprehensive mission caused many problems because of its ambiguousness and inability to have a specific direction. As Reitano (1988) commented, “the need for two-year colleges to re-evaluate their historical missions becomes increasingly great” (p. 125). Comprehensive community colleges continued to be “all things to all people” (Bailey & Averianova, 2000, p. 4). Yet, the comprehensive mission poses many challenges because of the academic, fiscal, and immeasurable realities (Brint & Karabel, 1995; Dougherty, 2001).

Tags:  Measuring 

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Partnerships Produce Results - Developing Statewide Degree Programs

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Partnerships Produce Results  - Developing Statewide Degree Programs

Guide Description:
This open discussion will describe the process of the academic teams at NorthWest Arkansas Community College and Arkansas State University who developed a curricular path from an applied associate’s degree focusing on entrepreneurship to a bachelor’s degree focusing on entrepreneurship.  This agreement is unique, stemming from a statewide entrepreneurship curriculum. 

Full Description:
NorthWest Arkansas Community College led the effort to develop a statewide entrepreneurship curriculum for community colleges.  However, the academic team at NWACC wasn’t content to develop an A.A.S. curriculum accepted by nine other community colleges in the state.  This presentation takes you through the process used to develop partnerships and curriculum allowing students to earn an A.A.S in Management with an entrepreneurship focus, an A.S. in Business Administration, and a B.S. in Business Administration with an entrepreneurship focus.

The partnership model developed by NorthWest Arkansas Community College and Arkansas State University provides students with a variety of educational options.  Existing entrepreneurs may take entrepreneurship classes without completing a degree.  Others may obtain the skills to start a business through the A.A.S. degree, and then grow with their business by completing the additional steps to the A.S. and B.S. degrees.  The complete program requires a few hours more than a traditional B.S. in Business Administration but provides a number of degree options for students.

Through this partnership the statewide emphasis toward economic development is one of the measures for success.  To improve student access, the programs will be delivered in multiple formats, face-to-face, online, video conference, and hybrid throughout the state. 

Partnerships produce results, and the NWACC – ASU partnership will provide a complete spectrum of entrepreneurship education across the state of Arkansas.  The format of the presentation will be open dialogue with the participants of the session.
Dr. Donna Wood, Associate Vice President, Global Business Development, NorthWest Arkansas Community College, AR
Tim Cornelius, Interim Dean, Business and Computer Information, NorthWest Arkansas Community College,
AR
Dr. James Washam, Associate Dean, College of Business, Arkansas State University, AR

Tags:  Linking K-16 

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Middle College for Middle Schools: “Grab Their Attention Early”

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Middle College for Middle Schools: “Grab Their Attention Early”

 

Guide Description:
A report on the educational partnership between a county middle school and the county’s community college entrepreneurial studies institute. Discussions will include the concept, planning, execution, results, and analysis of a middle school enrichment program that uses entrepreneurial studies as a focus for generating self efficacy and lifelong learning skills.

 

Full Description:
This presentation details the importance of reaching students in a county’s “learning chain” as early as possible. The idea being that tomorrow’s community college students are today’s middle school students and it is then, when they get hooked on learning and develop the seeds of purpose in their lives. The presentation will include ideas and examples on how to engage students using innovative approaches that focus on experiential learning models for business education. The overarching purpose of which is to create relevancy by experiencing firsthand, the tangible results of the students self directed planning and managing of a business enterprise they conceived, even if the results are sometimes failure. Important ancillary results envisioned included reinforcement of explicit core learning skills such as math, reading and writing and the development of implicit knowledge about team work and communication they will need later in life. 
  • Hand-Outs: MS PowerPoint will be the media used for the presentation and a hard copy of the presentation will be available to attendees. Also sample copies of teaching and learning materials used will be included and discussed.
  • Hands-On Activities: Both a demonstration of actual learning activities as well as an opportunity for attendees to take part as “typical middle school students” will be included.
Closing Reflection: Presenters will openly reflect on their 2007-2008 school year experiences acknowledging what went well, what went wrong and changes employed for the 2008-2009 school year.
 

Anthony E. Baker, Instructional Specialist, Anne Arundel Community College’s Entrepreneurial Studies Institute, MD

Sarah Frances Freeberg, Middle School Teacher Annapolis Middle School, MD

Tags:  Linking K-16 

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Serving the Well-Seasoned Student- a Recipe for Program Success

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Serving the Well-Seasoned Student- a Recipe for Program Success

 

Guide Description:

Spice up your Entrepreneurship program! Community Colleges are experiencing increased interest from a more “seasoned” population of older, non-traditional students who are seeking a career change to self-employment. Learn how to market to them, challenge them in the classroom, and bring new dollars into your college to support them.

 

Full Description:  
This high energy presentation will introduce the exploding market of well-seasoned students who are exploring, developing and reinventing themselves in this changing economy through self-employment. DCTC has identified three non-traditional target markets that have increased their program enrollment by more than 80% in fiscal year 2007-08. These include: dislocated workers who choose entrepreneurship because of downsizing; the reinventing entrepreneur who desires a new direction based on their passions; and the “refirement” entrepreneur who plans to retire early from traditional employment and fulfill their entrepreneurial dreams after age 55.

 

The session presenters will cover the topic from all viewpoints- faculty, program administrator, and a successful DCTC entrepreneur alum who will share with the attendees her real life experience as a student who re-entered college after age 40.

 

Learn the recipe for marketing and delivery to reach this non-traditional market. Take home the tools to utilize four key components to create entrepreneurial programming that will attract, engage and develop successful, business owners that can give back to your institution and achieve long-term program success.

  1. Education component: Both credit-based courses and short topical non-credit programming
  2. Financial component: Helping entrepreneurs set their financial goals and their capitalization for the future
  3. Networking component: Building skills and opportunities to explore collaboration and sell, sell, sell
  4. Support component: Building a life- long relationship between the entrepreneur and their college for survival

Finally, the presenters will share their “entrepreneurial” tactics to find grant funding and tuition to support the non-traditional entrepreneurship program.

 

Christine Pigsley, Associate Dean of Business & Entrepreneurship, Dakota County Technical College, MN

Bob Voss, Business Entrepreneur Instructor, Dakota County Technical College, MN

Mary Glock, Owner (DCTC Alumni), Detailed Promotions, MN

Tags:  Diverse Populations 

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Entrepreneurial Community = Economic Development: Community Involvement & Social Entrepreneurship – Actions Speak

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Entrepreneurial Community = Economic Development: Community Involvement & Social Entrepreneurship – Actions Speak

 

Guide Description:  

An Entrepreneurial Community creates an environment where entrepreneurs can thrive.  This requires a multi-faceted approach to economic development including education, recourse availability, small business owners and large companies alike.  When working in tandem, each group contributes something that enables entrepreneurs to succeed.

 

Full Description:  

The Tim’s will help provide practical insights and realistic strategies for creating and enhancing community entrepreneurship as a keystone of economic stability and long-term growth.  They will demonstrate the need for a change in community mindset including garnering support from the local government. They will also highlight what types of support services should be available for new and existing entrepreneurs as well as the education needed for success.  Community partnership development and social entrepreneurship activities will round out the session.
 
Tim Mittan, Director, Southeast Community College Entrepreneurship Center, NE

Tim Putnam, Associate Director, North Iowa Area Community College John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, IA

Tags:  Outreach 

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Community College and University Partnerships: Serving Local Entrepreneurs

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Community College and University Partnerships: Serving Local Entrepreneurs

 

Guide Description:  
Learn how Edmonds Community College and other community colleges partnered with the University of Washington/Bothell’s Business Development Center to connect with local entrepreneurs and assist them with start -up educational resources. Topics will include community outreach, funding and sustainability, developing and adapting community college curriculum, working with clients and advantages of university/community college partnerships.

 

Full Description:   

This presentation is aimed at community college faculty or staff new to working with community partners and clients. The purpose of the presentation is to provide ideas about how community college students in classes such as Accounting 101, can assist entrepreneurs. The focus will be on four areas: Identifying strengths and abilities and what the college can offer to local entrepreneurs; best practices in working with local universities to serve local entrepreneurs; faculty roles in working directly with clients in the classroom and student roles in working with clients in the classroom. Fund raising and sustainability best practices will be reviewed as well. The presentation will be in PowerPoint format with questions and answers and will include several handouts: Business Development Center mission, goals and activities; teaching activities; contracts; program data as well as a handout of the presentation. The format for the PowerPoint presentation will be “how to” and will include step by step information for each of the key topics discussed.

 
Overview of each area:

*Identifying strengths and abilities: How can community college students assist small business owners? What strengths do they bring to the table? What are the strengths of the college in serving entrepreneurs? What information is needed to know if a class (students and instructor) can really work with a “live” entrepreneur.

*Best practices: Why should a four-year university work with local community colleges? What are the strengths of the institutions? How should clients be assigned to certain classes? What steps need to be taken to sustain relationships?

*Faculty roles: Why would a faculty member want to bring an entrepreneur into his/her class rather than just teach through case studies? What impact does the live client have on the curriculum? What training is needed? How is existing curriculum impacted? Should faculty receive stipends for working with clients? How should work with clients be evaluated?

*Student roles: What are the responsibilities of students when they are presented with a live client? What training or preparation do they need? What rules of engagement need to be established? What are the advantages of dividing the class into groups? Should the entire class work with the client as a requirement or should it be on a voluntary basis? Should outcomes be linked to client satisfaction? How should students be evaluated?
 

Susan Loreen, Dean, Business Division, Edmonds Community College, WA

Kristen Spangler or Walt Freitag, Title, University of Washington/Bothell Business Development Center, WA

Tags:  Outreach 

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Customer Service – Not Just for the Entrepreneur

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 17, 2008
Customer Service – Not Just for the Entrepreneur

 

Guide Description: 

Ask any entrepreneur about the importance of customer service to the on-going success of their venture and chances are they’ll tell you customer service is paramount to success. How are we as faculty doing in providing great service to our students? This workshop explores the concept of customer service through the eyes of the student.

 

Full Desription:   

What’s your personal customer service scorecard? Are you meeting the needs of your students in a manner that helps them succeed? Customer service is a learned behavior and we can start our students down the path of great customer service by modeling the behavior that can make or break their business.

 

Participants will identify the strengths and weaknesses of their personal customer service style as well as that of their institution. Additionally participants will be challenged to define customer service in terms of how well they are helping their students understand the opportunities and obstacles of entrepreneurship.

 

Additionally, participants will be invited to engage in a discussion to share best practices in curriculum development and to discuss the potential of entrepreneurship education.

 

Hand-outs provided will include program requirement grid worksheets, suggested timelines, and suggestions for utilizing existing courses.
 

Ken Knox, Ph.D., Program Director, Business Management, Jefferson Community College, OH

Tags:  Faculty Development  Knox 

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