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6th Breakout Sessions
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This blog contains all breakout session presentations from the 6th annual conference, January 4-7, 2009 in Anaheim CA. Feel free to share this with colleagues, and post comments on the blog.

 

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Top tags: Curriculum  Outreach  Faculty Development  Linking K-16  Diverse Populations  Econ Dev Agencies  Leadership  Measuring  Fundraising  Knox  Entrepreneurial Leadership  Louis Lautman  millionaire  the yes movie  young entrepreneur 

Building an E-ship Center While Treading Water

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

Building an E-ship Center While Treading Water

Guide Description:
Learn how a community lead mini-grant grew into a Regional Entrepreneur Center resulting in the partnership of Morehead State University, Maysville Community and Technical College and the City of Maysville.  This alliance has resulted in educational programming - credit and non-credit, youth programs, SBDC services and an entrepreneurial friendly atmosphere.

Full Description:
This presentation will go in-depth on how a community group with a never say die attitude can bring about tremendous change in their community.  We will discuss the methods this group used to identify the need in the community and how they generated the partnerships that eventually evolved. 

1.  Kentucky Entrepreneurial Coaching Institute-This is a nationally awarded pilot program develop by Dr. Ron Hustedde from the University of Kentucky.

2.  Advisory Council for the Maysville Regional Entrepreneur Center

3.  Morehead State University-Consultant funding-SBDC program

4.  Maysville Community and Technical College. The catalyst that supplied the glue, funding and educational support.

5.  City of Maysville-provides additional funding, an office for the Maysville Regional Entrepreneur Center, incubator program and strong alliance between the Center and the Chamber of Commerce.

The presenter will explain all of the inter-workings of this very unique alliance. The presenter will highlight the birth of the Maysville Regional Entrepreneur Center, its function and the documentable results.

1.        Web-site and branding materials-Coleman Foundation Grant thru the NACCE .

2.       Educational programs offered by the Entrepreneur Center  (credit and non-credit)

3.       Morehead State SBDC-business development program

4.       Youth Entrepreneurship programs in the schools: college and high schools

5.       Business development and entrepreneurial atmosphere created by the Regional Entrepreneur Center.

The goal of this power-point presentation and discussion handouts is the audience will learn how to effectively use and work with community groups, utilize grants in developing programs, and navigate thru partnerships and alliances to make them work effectively.
Charles Jackson, Director, Maysville Regional Entrepreneur Center, Maysville Community & Technical College, KY

Tags:  Econ Dev Agencies 

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Field of Dreams: Houston Scores with Innovative Public/Private Funding Effort

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Field of Dreams:  Houston Scores with Innovative Public/Private Funding Effort

 

Guide Description:
Learn how through the power of innovative public/private partnerships, Houston Community College was able to engage in the development of a successful athletics facility initiative that will service the community and at the same time provide financial support to the HCC Foundation.   

 

Full Description:  

Presenters would focus on the following learning outcomes:

  • The dos and don’ts of working with multiple partnerships
  • Negotiation strategies that were utilized for the HCC athletic facility development
  • Program review of unique partnership with the City of Houston/and the sharing of infrastructural development
  • A financial model of the project would be distributed for discussion
  • HCC Foundation’s fundraising involvement would be diagramed and distributed along with information concerning the established partners- reviewing their contribution and benefits received
  • The relevance and importance to a community college audience would be emphasized through a discussion of the creative academic/workforce and instructional benefits that the HCC athletic facility provides to the community
Successful Private/Public partnership examples within other educational institutions would also be discussed.
 

Dr. Art Tyler, COO/Deputy Chancellor, Houston Community College, Texas

Dr. Kelly J. Zúñiga, CFRE, Executive Director, Houston Community College Foundation, TX

Tags:  Fundraising 

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Maximizing Entrepreneurial Collaborations: How a Regional Conference Created Effective Partnerships

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Maximizing Entrepreneurial Collaborations: How a Regional Conference Created Effective Partnerships

 

Guide Description:
This session offers a practical model for organizing and implementing a regional conference on Best Practices for Teaching Entrepreneurship and Innovation. By sharing an approach to conference planning that incorporates dynamic hands-on skills-building sessions and showcases local entrepreneurial spirit, Colorado Mountain College demonstrates how a stimulating venue for conference participants fosters K-16 partnerships and interdisciplinary collaborations to enhance the delivery of entrepreneurship education. This project was partially funded by a Coleman elevator grant.

 

Full Description:
The purpose of this session is to provide a model for community colleges that may want to plan and host a successful regional conference for best practices for teaching entrepreneurship and innovation. The model is based on a conference that Colorado Mountain College (CMC) initiated, developed, coordinated, and hosted at its Timberline Campus in Leadville, Colorado from June 5 to 7, 2008. CMC is a comprehensive community college with a service area of 12,000 square miles in the north central Rocky Mountains. 

 

The conference brought together entrepreneurship educators from postsecondary and secondary schools, students, practicing entrepreneurs, and governmental and not-for-profit support organizations to discuss and develop best practices for delivering entrepreneurship education and training and recruiting and retaining students. In addition, the conference participants created state-wide partnerships and interdisciplinary collaborations to enhance learning experiences of entrepreneurship students at all levels and in all venues. 

 
The session will consist of a PowerPoint presentation and discussion that highlights the conference planning time table, setting and facilities, program schedule and speakers/presenters, promotions and marketing, food and accommodations, transportation, management tools, vendor exhibits, conference materials, equipment and support, and entertainment. In addition, the presentation will include the conference fundraising strategies, budgeting, and evaluation. 
 
The presentation will emphasize lessons learned that will impact the planning and implementation of future conferences. We hope that the session attendees will learn from the changes that we plan to make in the logistics, outreach, and fundraising for next year’s conference. 
 
Our goal is to encourage other community colleges to plan and host regional conferences on entrepreneurship education and training. These colleges can learn from our experience and we are willing to provide advice during their planning process. The session attendees will receive a “how-to” Conference Planning Guide that includes a planning timetable.
 

Susanna B. Spaulding, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director-Entrepreneurship Program, Colorado Mountain College, CO

Nicole M. Fazande, MAEd, Division Director II-Dillon Center, Summit Campus

Colorado Mountain College, CO

Tags:  Linking K-16 

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Strategic Partnerships – the New Future?

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

Strategic Partnerships – the New Future?

 

Guide Description: 

When the future depends on strategic partnerships with economic development agencies, how can a community college develop a strategy which facilitates such a partnership and stays focused on building the best educational programmes possible? This presentation is based on the theoretical framework of private/public partnerships and public/public partnerships in a European setting. Niels Brock’s I-House has secured funding from a regional economic development agency. The funding is extensive but what is the impact on the I-House? and what are the implications? The presentation will entail reflections and recommendations on how to create a strategic partnership which enables the college to retain as much influence as possible in order to fulfill the vision and mission of the college whilst obtaining financial support.

  

Pernille Berg, Head of Innovation and Development, Niels Brock, Copenhagen, DK

Tags:  Econ Dev Agencies 

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Supporting the Business of Child Care

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Supporting the Business of Child Care

 

Guide Description:
Child care providers frequently do not view themselves as business owners.    This session will focus on the business issues they face and how to effectively structure a course to address these issues.  Additional topics include key resources and partnerships that can strengthen the program, recruitment techniques, and articulation strategies.   

 

Full Description:
This session will focus on business education and training for the home-based  and small center provider.  Many of the owners of these businesses do not perceive themselves as business owners, leading to a relatively high rate of business failure or closure.  Currently most cities face a chronic lack of quality, licensed programs in large part due to the challenges of managing a low margin business such as child care. 

 

Many colleges offer child care training, focusing on child development.  We have observed that a business course, whether taught for credit or non-credit is a great adjunct to these programs, and can actually increase enrollment in the child development courses.  We will use case studies of community colleges who are offering such programs, in addition to discussion of the core business issues that should be covered in this class.  Because many entrepreneurship educators will not be familiar with the resources related to this industry specific area, we will also provide resource lists and descriptions.  Recruitment will also be covered, as many of the target participants may already be caring for children in their home and require specific outreach efforts.  We will have participants complete a sample activity used in the program that is co-sponsored and taught by the First Step Fund and the Francis Family Child Care program based at Penn Valley Community College in Kansas City.   Lastly, we will discuss the potential funding and promotional benefits a college can realize by  sponsoring such a course.
 

Kate Duffy, Entrepreneurship Instructor and Coordinator, Penn Valley Community College, part of  the Metropolitan Community Colleges in Kansas, MO

Dorothy Browning, National Curricula Manager, First Step Fund, MO

Tags:  Diverse Populations 

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Business Incubation: Linking Your Entrepreneurship Program to the Real World

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Business Incubation:  Linking Your Entrepreneurship Program to the Real World

 

Guide Description: 

Learn how a business incubation program can enhance both your entrepreneurship curriculum and its ties to the local business and economic development communities. This session will give an overview of the business incubation concept and provide real-world examples of how community colleges have used business incubation successfully to strengthen their entrepreneurship programs.

 

Full Description:
 This session is designed for participants who have a general understanding of business incubation but need practical information on how a business incubator works and how it can be incorporated into an entrepreneurship program.

 

Subjects that will be covered include:

  • An overview of the incubation process
  • How an incubator can strengthen an entrepreneurship curriculum
  • How to tell when an incubator does (or doesn't) makes sense on campus
  • Key tips for operating an incubator efficiently and effectively
  • Common issues and practical solutions

Course Materials:  Participants will receive workbooks that include the slides used in the presentation and a list of additional resources. The presenters will be available via e-mail to answer questions after the event.

 

Presentation Method:  We will use an interactive style that combines lecture, questions from participants and group discussion.
 

Tracy Kitts, VP COO, National Business Incubation Association, OH

Deborah King, Director, Springfield Business Incubator, Andrew M. Scibelli Enterprise Center, MA

Tags:  Outreach 

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Faculty Development Toward a Learning College: A Successful Story

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Faculty Development Toward a Learning College: A Successful Story

 

Guide Description:
Discover how a business woman became a tenured faculty member and Chair of the faculty development committee and implemented with passion and with her team,  a five-year strategy to move faculty toward learner-centered classrooms and workforce preparation. The key to success was “peer mentoring” to educate colleagues in learner-centered strategies.

 

Full Description:  

The faculty development committee at College of the Desert in Palm Desert, California went through a four-year action science-based evaluation of faculty development toward a learning college.  At the same time, the Chair of the Faculty Development Committee conducted research while working on her dissertation titled: Faculty Development Toward a Learning College: Peer Mentoring and Critical Reflection on Learner-Centered Teaching Techniques.  Another faculty member, also working on his PhD, conducted research on student response to learner-centered versus teacher-centered classroom instruction. Both found significant results in their qualitative and quantitative data. 

 

The uniqueness of this presentation is the strong tie between problem-based learning and learner-centered classrooms to the preparation of students for 21st century employment.  The model used at this college also helped faculty incorporate “workplace skills” into higher education curriculum, such as flexibility, team decision making, problem solving, leadership, goal setting, and managing change.

 

The real value-add is the experience of the presenter - a business woman recruited from the business sector (companies include Hewlett-Packard, Electric Lightwave, and Executive Forum) to implement a Continuing Education and Workforce Development program as a tenured faculty member.  She discovered “the land of 1000 ‘no’s’” when it came to moving toward learner-centered classrooms and work preparation skills.  The true story is the strategy she used to influence change.

 

Handouts will include journal articles written on the subject by Dr. Wendy Flint and faculty survey tools.  Participants will have access to her book Problem-based Learning: Welcome to the Real World, course syllabi designed around student learning outcomes, problem-based learning, and workplace skills.  A PowerPoint will be used along with one interactive activity.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the use of action science research as a method of quality assurance and improvement for faculty development
  • Plan future workshops for faculty that give practical instruction on implementing workplace skills into existing course outlines and curriculum
  • Develop a strategy to move faculty toward learner-centered classrooms using a diverse committee
  • Discover what works and what doesn’t work when influencing faculty

Dr. Wendy Flint, Senior Vice President, Boston Reed College, CA

Tags:  Faculty Development 

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Developing Successful Entrepreneurship Curricula

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

Developing Successful Entrepreneurship Curricula

 

Guide Description:

This session will focus on the development of Entrepreneurship Programs that meet the needs of the community as a whole.  While any new curriculum should consider how it relates to the population, goals and functions of the community it serves, this is especially true when the program is focused on Entrepreneurship.  This presentation will highlight these components, along with discussions on how community links may be strengthened.

  

Full Description:

This presentation will focus on the facets of curriculum development, how they link with the community needs, and the interaction among colleges and various entities within the locale.  This presentation and discussion will revolve around four steps of curricular development. 

Building a successful and future-oriented curriculum combines  logic and creativity.  Any educational institution, whether it be a nationally acclaimed university or a recognized community college, serves the purpose of meeting student learning needs and providing graduates who can operate successfully within their chosen arenas.  Programs contribute to achievement of community goals and meet the requirements of workforce development. 

 Building an entrepreneurship curriculum is more than pulling together a collection of courses.  It is a studied and focused process.   As a relatively newly recognized discipline, an entrepreneurship curriculum cannot rely on tradition.   This presentation centers on four steps which comprise the journey to success. 

The process starts with realistic scans of a particular community to determine its characteristics and their impact on the evolving curriculum.  Is the community rural, urban, suburban; focused on one or two industries; growing, or pointed to the future?  What exists, what needs support, and what is yet to be developed?  The what and how of this is part of the presentation.

Next, one must determine the pertinent characteristics of the students?  What age ranges predominate; are students seeking job placement and/or advancement; do they intend to transfer, complete associate degrees, or complete certificates only?   Discussion will include how these factors influence the format of the curriculum.

There follows an identification of realistic skill sets that will meld with the goals and directions set by the above factors.  This includes not just skills related to the major, but also the need for general education accomplishments. Confirmation of the skill by experts in the field provides a solid base from which to proceed.  

Translation of these skills into a various courses—traditional, existing, and newly formed-- and a determination of the learning experiences that will reside in the courses follows.  These courses need to incorporate appropriate objectives and designation of learning experiences that sustain the learning.  For example, will there be independent study, internships, use of mentors, incorporation of real business situations, and formation of business clubs.  Students need to apply theory in realistic environments.  Examination of specific curricula will help illustrate these two parts of the process.

An overview of how several related Entrepreneurship programs progressed through the development phases will be the foci of this presentation.  Techniques which elicit features of major community elements, along with their application to curriculum evolvement will be shared with the attendees. Attendees will have an opportunity to discuss these four aspects of curricular development and present their solutions to related case studies.
 

Sharon Schmickley, Chariperson of the Business and Computer Systems Division Institution, Howard Community College, MD

Tags:  Curriculum 

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Entrepreneurial Education: An Integrated Curricular Approach

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Entrepreneurial Education: An Integrated Curricular Approach

 

Guide Description:
The Integrated Business and Entrepreneurship Program at Spokane Community College is a cutting edge, interdisciplinary, immersion style approach to mentoring entrepreneurs through a yearlong process of learning in an integrated model. 

 

Full Description:

Traditional education approaches to entrepreneurship are examined and contrasted with an integrated model. Typical approaches to entrepreneurship education remain static using a common silo delivery method. Students are given limited choices of which classes to enroll in, times to enroll, and often, who will be instructing. This interjects a dysfunction into an otherwise systematic approach necessary for an entrepreneur to develop a business idea from discovery to launch. To breakdown the silo’s inherent in our educational systems, the faculty at Spokane Community College created an environment where a core of five instructors, various community leaders, and business persons collaborate to deliver content targeted to enhance and stimulate learning. Information delivered when information is needed is information that is used! We set the students on a yearlong path of entrepreneurial discovery and adventure that clarifies their understanding of the entrepreneurial process, business plan development, and launch of a civic based business with lasting personal and community impacts.
 

Greg Richards, Project Director, Spokane Community College, WA

Rick Street, MAcc, CPA, CIA, CB, Accounting Instructor and Small Business Owner, Spokane Community College, WA

Barbara Rielly, Business Technology – Legal Instructor, Spokane Community College, WA

Diana Osborne, Economics and Statistics Instructor, Spokane Community College, WA

Duane Sunwold, Hospitality Instructor, Spokane Community College, WA

Bill Powers, General Business Instructor and Small Business Owner, Spokane Community College, WA

Tags:  Curriculum 

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Credit-Free Certificates for Busy Adults: Matching Curriculum and Course Design to High Job-Demands in the Community

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

Credit-Free Certificates for Busy Adults:  Matching Curriculum and Course Design to High Job-Demands in the Community

 

Guide Description:
Discover how a Maryland college evaluates the workforce needs of their community, internally designs or outsources short-term courses with high profits, markets effectively for high enrollments, partners with local government agencies for student funding, and collects FTEs from the state.  It's a win-win for continuing education, the student, the college, and the local economy.

 

Full Description:

Career changers, retirees, former stay-at-home Moms and others are looking for short-term occupational training programs. What non-credit programs can you offer to this unique group of learners that will work with their busy schedules and provide them with focused training to enter a new career?

Discuss why a traditional credit program and schedule may not fit the needs of these learners and why non-credit programs can be a compliment to the school’s offerings rather than competition.

Find and create partnerships that allow you to add programs quickly to meet local demand.

Identify agencies that can provide funding for short-term career programs.

Assess the benefits to all parties in terms of workforce training for the local economy, short-term training for students and increased enrollments for the college.

 

Model programs will be identified, including: Pharmacy Technician; Wedding Planning Certification; Orthopedic Technician; Optometric Technician; Medical Transcription; and Personal Fitness Trainer Certification. Model partnerships with agencies include the Workforce Investment Board and Maryland Business Works. Interactive elements will include defining the adult learner and identifying their training needs and goals including schedule and timeframe preferences. Handouts will include Best Practices for Partnerships and marketing materials.
 

Elaine Wilson, Project Director Continuing Education & Workforce Training, Chesapeake College, MD

Jackie Potter, Executive Director of Continuing Education & Workforce Training, Chesapeake College, MD

Tags:  Curriculum 

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