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6th Breakout Sessions
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This blog contains all breakout session presentations from the 6th annual conference, January 4-7, 2009 in Anaheim CA. Feel free to share this with colleagues, and post comments on the blog.

 

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Top tags: Curriculum  Outreach  Faculty Development  Linking K-16  Diverse Populations  Econ Dev Agencies  Leadership  Measuring  Fundraising  Knox  Entrepreneurial Leadership  Louis Lautman  millionaire  the yes movie  young entrepreneur 

Redesigning Classes with an Entrepreneurial Approach

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Redesigning Classes with an Entrepreneurial Approach

 

Guide Description:

Biology course sections were redesigned with an entrepreneurial focus while still meeting the standard measurable outcomes designated for the course.  Several modes of data collection were used to compare entrepreneurial and traditional sections.  The findings will be presented and a discussion will center on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial education.  

 

Full Description:

Two multi-section biology courses at Parkland College were redesigned with an entrepreneurial focus.  These changes give students practice with entrepreneurial skills such as maximizing class participation (both in and out of the classroom), scientific evaluation, recognizing and utilizing opportunity and marketing of ideas. To determine the impact of incorporating entrepreneurial education into these curricula, both quantitative or qualitative measurements of success were examined, which ultimately improved the assessment that goes on in these two courses. 

 

Corporate Entrepreneurship in Nutrition:  Successful aspects of the entrepreneurial section included higher retention rates, and final grades  than in the traditional sections.  Entrepreneurial students believed they increased their knowledge, improved their problem solving skills, better understood the scientific process and improved knowledge needed in the field.  Student testimonials in the form of reflection papers also provide anecdotal evidence of success. 

 

Social Entrepreneurship in Environmental Biology: The redesigned curriculum showed greater success in skills such as: increased awareness of global environmental issues; use of science as a tool in solution-oriented problem solving; connection of content with the community; and personal empowerment to “do something”.  Data collected throughout several semesters will be presented to support the increase in these skills in entrepreneurial sections.

 

Though content-oriented outcomes did not differ among sections in either course, we will discuss how assessing both quantitative and qualitative results can show the success of entrepreneurial education.  This will be followed by a lively discussion on how to use these result to effectively design courses and assess the effectiveness of specific instructional strategies.
 

Heidi Leuszler, Associate Professor, Parkland College, IL

Toni Burkhalter, Title: Associate Professor, Parkland College, IL

Tags:  Measuring 

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Supporting Small Business Development in Rutherford County, North Carolina

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Supporting Small Business Development in Rutherford County, North Carolina

 

Guide Description:

During this session, participants will learn more about the partnership between NC REAL Enterprises and Isothermal Community College to encourage entrepreneurship education and small business growth in Rutherford County, North Carolina. This effort will result in a comprehensive education collaborative that will create economic opportunities and increase the standard of living for the local residents and be replicable to other counties suffering from job losses.

 

Full Description:

During this session participants will learn more about how a project Supporting Small Business Development in a rural community of Rutherford County, NC, resulted in partnership between NC REAL Enterprises and Isothermal Community College’s Small Business Center. The project assists individuals who want to make the transition from factory and other related work that is in decline in the area to entrepreneurial careers in the small business economy.  NC REAL is collaborating with Isothermal Community College and other community leaders to offer aspiring entrepreneurs appropriate entrepreneurship education courses, one-on-one technical assistance and access to additional resources, networks and information regarding loan capital.  In addition, NC REAL supports participants in the REAL programs through follow up services provided by ConnectInc’s Next Steps Program which customizes its high-tech case management services to address the unique needs of dislocated workers.  

 

This effort will result in a comprehensive education collaborative that will create economic opportunities and increase the standard of living for Rutherford County and be replicable to other counties hard hit by NAFTA job losses and plant closings.  In addition to capacity building, the following outcomes are expected over the two-year grant period.   This effort will help start 40 new businesses and improve or expand 20 existing businesses by training 128 individuals with a full array of entrepreneurship and business planning courses and seminars including targeted seminars on financials and marketing, and using technology for business, online business skills modules, loan capital information sessions, and other short business seminars based on participants’ needs that are being held at Isothermal Community College.
 

Anna Koltchagova, Interim Executive Director, NC REAL Enterprises, NC

Kim Alexander, Director, Small Business Center, Isothermal Community College, NC

Tags:  Econ Dev Agencies 

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How PHCC Started a College Grown Venture Forum

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
How PHCC Started a College Grown Venture Forum

 

Guide Description:

With a successful certificate and degree granting Entrepreneurship/Small Business program it seemed logical to look at providing funding and business mentoring for new and emerging businesses.  As a result the Patrick Henry Community College Small Business Investment Forum had its first competition from Fall 2008-Spring 2009, ultimately awarding cash and business mentoring to two entrepreneurs.

 

Full Description:

Providing start-up capital for entrepreneurs is the next step for community colleges that want to provide the ultimate support to their entrepreneurs. This session will describe the process used by Patrick Henry Community College’s Foundation to create the Patrick Henry Community College Small Business Investment Forum (the Forum), a public/private partnership resulting in a competitive process used to award cash and business mentoring to new and emerging companies.  The presentation will include a discussion regarding selling the idea to the college, and convincing public and private organizations to provide resources, The Forum’s commitment that an entity had to “pay to play” to be part of the judging panel, an important decision for any venture forum, will also be discussed.  Finally, expectations and changes that the Forum hopes to integrate into its second year will be presented.  Hand-outs include judging forms used during the competition, correspondence to “winners” and “losers”, and media coverage.
 

Natalie Harder, Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director of the Foundation, Patrick Henry Community College, VA

Tags:  Fundraising 

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Building a Pathway: Linking High School, Two - and Four - Year College Campuses

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Building a Pathway:  Linking High School, Two - and Four - Year College Campuses  

 

Guide Description: 

The Community College Entrepreneurial Pathway is a unique partnership that has resulted in consistent curriculum and programs across 10 community colleges and California State University, Fresno.  The goals are to:  build a higher level of knowledge and skills among young adults by building an “Entrepreneurial Pathway” from high school, community college to four year college; to prepare students to launch their own business at any point along the pathway; and to bring consistency to the delivery of entrepreneurial education in the Central Valley. 

 

 Full Description: 

Communities are recognizing the economic value of promoting entrepreneurship among young people by fostering a mindset that can lead to the launch of new businesses, reverse the trend of “brain drain” and increase the number of new jobs in the community.

 

This presentation discusses a holistic approach to building an entrepreneurship program on a community college campus and describes a unique partnership that has resulted in consistent curriculum and programs across 10 community colleges and California State University, Fresno.  The goals are to build a higher level of knowledge and skills among young adults (and others) by building an “Entrepreneurial Pathway” from community college to graduation from a four year college and to bring consistency and unity to the delivery of entrepreneurial education at community college and four year institutions in the Central Valley.  The “Entrepreneurial Pathway” is built through collaboration among Central Valley high schools, community colleges, and California State University, Fresno. By structuring a program composed of common curricula and common skill development, students can begin building a career of self-employment by following a path that enables them to use their classroom training while simultaneously building opportunities for a new venture launch.  To assist in venture launch and sustainability another important element of the CCEP is the development of on-campus or community based incubators and/or entrepreneurship centers.

 

Attendees will learn about the essential elements in building a pathway to connect two year and four year institutions which includes curriculum and program development, community outreach, educational institution partnerships and incubator development.
 

Genelle Taylor, Associate Director, Lyles Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, California State University, CA

Marianne Dunklin, Program Director, Community College Entrepreneurial Pathway, California State University, Fresno, CA

Eric Nasalroad, Faculty, Reedley College, CA

Brent Calvin, Dean, Business Division, College of the Sequoias, CA

Tags:  Linking K-16 

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Supported Self Employment

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Supported Self Employment

 

Guide Description:
Not being seen as competent, fear of losing benefits and not being taken seriously are barriers that keep Individuals with disabilities from becoming small business owners.  With small business ownership becoming the fastest growing segment for new employment options in the United States, the NEBA BCC is supporting these individuals and their teams to become successful business owners.
 
Full Description:
New England Business Associates Business Consulting Center, located in the Andrew Scibelli Enterprise Center at Springfield Technical Community College is assisting individuals with significant barriers reach their dream of business ownership.  It is here that these entrepreneurs with disabilities network with other entrepreneurs and receive training and support from the Small Business Administration, Western New England College’s Law and Business Center for Advancing Entrepreneurship, the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center and SCORE, all located in the Enterprise Center.

This session will discuss how individuals with disabilities, once considered unemployable, can successfully start up and manage their own businesses.  Supported employment in the disability field  has proven to be a successful model for employing individuals in the community.  Using these same concepts, hear from individuals with disabilities how, with the support of a team, they have been able to become successful business owners.

Must have partners are discussed as well as funding options available to this unique population of entrepreneurs.
 

Jeannine Pavlak, Executive Director, New England Business Associates, MA

Gayle Hsiao, Consultant, Springfield Technical Community College, MA

Tags:  Diverse Populations 

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First You Panic, Then You Gasp, Then You Study!

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
First You Panic, Then You Gasp, Then You Study!

 

Guide Description:

Metropolitan Community College of Kansas City faced the loss of a major grant, a newly created Department of Entrepreneurship with no resources, and a faculty and staff questioning direction of the entire initiative.  Focus groups to vent frustration were held.  Script development and results will be presented for future use. 

 

Full Description:

Metropolitan Community College of Kansas City created a Department of Entrepreneurship and hired a Director in anticipation of a multi-million dollar grant.  When the granting agency dissolved the program, MCC was left with a grand plan, but no resources to implement it.  Hundreds, if not thousands, of work hours had been spent to develop an entrepreneurship program that would span MCC’s five campus 42,000 student, 1300 employee district.  Emotions quickly ran high, and after several months, it was decided to put the entrepreneurship program in a lower profile and focus on gathering institutional support.  Focus groups were the agreed upon method of providing a venting opportunity, but more importantly, developing a vision of where this diverse institution wanted entrepreneurship to proceed. 

 

To begin, a script was developed that would not only allow closure on the grant experience, but gather information needed to better understand how the five campuses wanted entrepreneurship to impact them individually.  Focus groups were then conducted with students, faculty, staff, and administration for each of MCC’s five campuses.  A qualitative analysis was then done for each group and between groups.  The results reflected MCC’s diversity of students and employees, but also created a common ground upon which to start building MCC’s view of entrepreneurship.  From this common foundation, MCC has worked, and continues to work, to impact the greater Kansas City metro area with an agenda largely determined by the very students, faculty and staff implementing and being affected by the entrepreneurship program.
 

Todd D. Mick, Ph.D., Director of Entrepreneurship, Metropolitan Community College, MO

Clint Dougherty, Program Coordinator for Entrepreneurship, Metropolitan Community College, MO

Tags:  Diverse Populations 

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Using Outreach Programs to Market to Diverse Populations

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

Using Outreach Programs to Market to Diverse Populations

Guide Description:

This session will discuss the importance of setting up community entrepreneurship courses that encompass both Outreach Programs and Diverse Populations. Specific examples such as partnering with your local Chambers, Boys and Girls clubs, and Vocational Rehabilitation Organizations, to offer classes that appeal to the masses, yet making sure that they have a focus that meets the criteria needed to establish loans through Voc. Rehab, and college credit for those who need to start their lives in a more focused environment will be discussed. West Kentucky Community and Technical College's Entrepreneurship program receives referrals from all of the above local community partners, and has great results from our students. Outcomes: Colleges will be able to use our model to create dynamic entrepreneurship programs that inspire minorities and disabled community members, and give them the needed tools to succeed in business.

 

Astarre Gudino, Coordinator of Continuing Education and Community Services, West Kentucky Community and Technical College, KY

Tags:  Outreach 

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A Better Way to Integrate Entrepreneurial Objectives Into Your Curriculum

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
A Better Way to Integrate Entrepreneurial Objectives Into Your Curriculum

 

Guide Description:

Looking for curriculum that aligns with your learning objectives?  Don’t waste time sorting through a vast array of content, technologies, and providers. Take control of your content and revision cycles with customized curriculum and save your students up to 50 percent on the cost of textbooks in the process.

 

Full Description:
Curricula development and implementation has become a high wire act often performed without a net.  New technologies and increased access to content are providing faculty and program administrators a tremendous amount of choice. Everyone finds it difficult to balance time and cost against the quality of the student learning experience.  Customized curriculum provides a needed guide, producing better course materials, lower costs, and less work.

 

What is customized curriculum?  How can you assess your readiness for this transformation?  What types of value propositions can you create for students, faculty, and program administrators?

 

This session explores these critical questions and provides a guide for making the most of customization. Strategies and the “how to’s” of customized curriculum include:  keeping your content “evergreen,” aligning materials with course objectives (and not vice versa), and developing and profitably managing customization projects. 

 

Attendees will also discuss the current challenges faculty and program managers are facing in curricula development and implementation; the different approaches to customizing course materials including the pros and cons of each; how other institutions have successfully adopted customized curriculum; the publishing tools available; and how to take the information provided in this session and move forward with their institution.
 

Isaac Mowder, Director of Marketing, ED MAP, OH

Dr. Kenneth C. Sherman, VP Business Development, ED MAP, OH

Tags:  Curriculum 

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Authentic Activities for Engaging Online Entrepreneurship Students

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008
Authentic Activities for Engaging Online Entrepreneurship Students

 

Guide Description:  

Online learning presents a challenging context for design of authentic engaged learning. Participate in exploring the instructional design aspects of creating authentic activities for online entrepreneurship courses. In other words, this session seeks to help alleviate “new course design panic” and foster confidence in creating authentic activities for your online learners.

50 words

 

Full Description:

In the past three years of designing and teaching courses at Laramie County Community College (LCCC) for our new A.A.S. Entrepreneurship Degree program and certificates there have been many design challenges for both day and distance delivery courses. The objective of this session is to dig deeper into actual components of a few courses in the program and share what type of assignments and activities are generating the most authentic learning for distance entrepreneurship students. Course syllabus, assignments, assessment strategies, student feedback data and other experiential knowledge will be shared to help add value to those who develop and teach new courses from scratch and/or use established curriculum modules from vetted vendors. This session will also provide a forum for discussion of issues such as: If the business plan submitted by a student is still quite rough does that mean they should fail the course? What do we really mean by entrepreneurship education effectiveness and how should it be measured? Is the only measure the immediate creation of a profitable new start up business? What kind of student data should be tracked? Should institutional program reviews be different for entrepreneurship programs?   As NACCE colleagues we can help each other immensely with our open conversations and sharing of both the successes and the misfires in working with the highly creative, independent and sometimes unpredictable entrepreneurship learner.
 

Belinda Kolb, Ph.D., ABD, Manager, Entrepreneurship Program, Laramie County Community College, WY

Tags:  Curriculum 

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The Design and Development of a Creative Arts Entrepreneurship Program

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 18, 2008

The Design and Development of a Creative Arts Entrepreneurship Program

 

Guide Description:

This presentation tells the story of a research based approach to program development. The newly designed Creative Arts Entrepreneurship Certificate program provides targeted business information for creative professionals in the form of a series of short courses. Participants will receive a CD_ROM with course outlines.
 
Full Description:
Most creative professionals (writers, musicians and visual artists) will work as freelancers or small business owners during their careers. The New Media Center surveyed and interviewed 50 creative business owners in order to identify the most important, necessary skill sets for successful creative arts entrepreneurs.  The research also included the survey of 100 college and 50 high school students. The purpose of this secondary research was to identify and gauge student interest in the topic. Based on this information, a certificate program was developed - the first such systematic program design approach in this subject area within the California community college system.  The Creative Arts Entrepreneurship Certificate program provides highly targeted business information in salesmanship, marketing, finance, self-promotion as well as appropriate areas of the law, such as copyrights and patents.

 

The  presentation will provide statistical data along with detailed program and course content information.

This Adobe Flash based interactive, animated presentation will be particularly interesting for faculty and administrators working in creative disciplines , such as creative writing, music, animation, multimedia, graphic and web design, film/video and so on.  

 

All presentation participants will receive  a CD-ROM with  program description and course outlines.  The participants will also receive handouts identifying resources and appropriate literature.
 

Dr. Anna Szabados, Director, Northern California New Media Center, Mission College, CA

Tags:  Curriculum 

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