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The State of Entrepreneurship on NACCE Community College Campuses

Posted By Guin Griswold, Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, February 17, 2015

NACCE members are igniting entrepreneurship on campus. As an association, we wanted to benchmark the work bein

NACCE members are igniting entrepreneurship on campus. As an association, we wanted to benchmark the work being done as well as better understand challenges that our members are facing. We want to provide members with the resources they need to grow entrepreneurship programs across campus and community as well as be able to apply the entrepreneurial method to their current challenges on campus.

The following is the summary of the responses of 92 members.

2015 Member Survey Results

 

g done as well as better understand challenges that our members are facing. We want to provide members with the resources they need to grow entrepreneurship programs across campus and community as well as be able to apply the entrepreneurial method to their current challenges on campus.

 

The following is the summary of the responses of 92 members.

Tags:  2015 Trends  Member Survey Results 

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Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Sunday, February 08, 2015

We invite you to share in a conversation with Sara Whiffen, Effectuation expert and the Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action grantees on a question that many of us deal with on our campuses every day. 

Which metrics or measurements do you think best capture the mindset of effectuation -- and why?

Please comment on this posting with your thoughts, ideas, and questions.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Fox Valley TC Pilots an Accelerated Entrepreneurial Mindset Course

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Sunday, February 08, 2015

By: Douglas Schacht, Entrepreneurship Instructor,  Fox Valley Technical College, Appleton WI

For more information email: schacht@fvtc.edu 

The 2014-2015 Coleman Foundation Grant received by Fox Valley Technical College is focused on promoting and piloting an accelerated three-credit entrepreneurial mindset course as an elective for students in program areas that naturally lend themselves to self-employment (horticulture, residential construction, interior design, culinary arts, etc.).  The project was specifically designed to address Presidents for Entrepreneurship Pledge Action Steps 1, 2, 4, & 5.  We chose to create an accelerated, 5-day, 3-credit course to be taught during our January 2015 and August 2015 interim weeks.  Our goal was 15 students per class, and our inaugural class that recently wrapped up had 12 students in it from a variety of program areas. 

I recently completed reading and grading their final reflection papers and was pleasantly surprised by many of the comments shared by students.  The overarching theme went something like “I had no idea what to expect walking into this course but am so glad I took it.  After this experience I am more confident in my future than I ever could have imagined.”  Reflecting on those comments it seems clear that we did a good job helping those students embrace their internal locus of control and power to choose which is critical for these future entrepreneurs. 

A significant lesson learned is that we need to do a better job educating our internal stakeholders on what this course provides and use the students from this course as ambassadors in the recruitment process for the August course.  We will also be reaching out to our Student Life team to engage them in the shaping of this course and outcomes moving forward.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  fox valley technical college  NACCE 

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Patrick Henry Community College's Effectual Journey

Posted By Kimberly Buck, Friday, January 30, 2015

Kimberly Buck
Community Development Coordinator
Patrick Henry Community College
kbuck@patrickhenry.edu 

 

Our small city in southern Virginia was built on entrepreneurship – and we believe it’s the key to revitalizing our area. Together with NACCE, a grant from the Coleman Foundation, and our crazy quilt, Patrick Henry Community College is introducing effectual thinking to our students, staff, and the public.

Once upon a time, at the turn of the previous century, a group of enterprising young businessmen turned a small tobacco town into a hub of furniture and textile production. Martinsville was the Sweatshirt Capital of the World for some time, and it all began with a handful of entrepreneurs starting small businesses that turned into international corporations. Now that much of our former industry has moved overseas, our economy is shifting and making a comeback. Our focus with our Coleman grant is on training people to be their own bosses, to start businesses that can’t be outsourced, to add to our local quality of life and employ our neighbors. We also want to show our stakeholders how effectual thinking can be applied to solve problems and come up with innovative solutions.

PHCC has a great entrepreneurship and small business management program on the credit side of the house that is taught by a successful local businessman. We have worked with NACCE for more than a year to introduce effectual principles to our faculty, staff, and local business leaders. However, we needed to take our efforts to the next level and bring these valuable lessons campus and community-wide.

Last spring, we piloted two entrepreneurial programs, hosting the area’s first Martinsville Mini Maker Faire and a Jump Start! Student Entrepreneurship weekend. Though we had a very short turnaround time to market these events and drum up registrations, there was a great response from the community. The Mini Maker Faire, a free and family-friendly festival of innovation, drew more than 200 members of the public. The Jump Start weekend was marketed to local high school and college students and offered a “crash course” on effectuation and the nuts and bolts of starting a business. More than 20 students signed up and spent their Friday evening and all day Saturday in the workshops, and two new businesses resulted from our program. This showed us that there is a need and a hunger for entrepreneurial education in our community.

We applied to the Coleman Foundation to continue and expand these efforts to encourage innovation and entrepreneurial thinking, as well as providing professional development to our staff. After learning from the NACCE conference how other community colleges are implementing effectuation, we’ve made some strategic pivots and revised our plan. We’ve had to make lemonade when our original plan of a campus-wide rollout in January was not possible, and when a planned speaker proved too expensive for our budget.

First, we decided to take it a bit slower for deeper implementation. We plan to bring a speaker here to “train the trainers” on our campus this semester and then roll out the campus-wide initiative at the beginning of the fall semester. One of our Birds in Hand is the campus SCALE team, which stands for the Southern Center for Active Learning Excellence. The team is comprised of six certified instructors on the PHCC faculty from a variety of disciplines who have successfully delivered trainings to more than 120 other colleges. They will be empowered this spring to disseminate the effectuation message well beyond the end of the grant period.

Also, our Jump Start weekend has changed form. We’re working with members of our Crazy Quilt to bring the Extreme Entrepreneurship tour to Martinsville. (If you were fortunate enough to meet Sheena Lindahl at the NACCE conference, this is her company.) Students who participate in our entrepreneurship event will be eligible to compete in a pitch competition for prizes to get their business idea off the ground.

Partnership gives us a chance to combine our financial and human resources with another workforce organization and the local high schools to make this exciting tour happen. That doesn’t mean this is an easy process – the more partners in our quilt, the longer it takes to make decisions and schedule events. But, together, we will touch a larger audience and will be able to make something happen that formerly was out of reach.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  economic development  effectuation  innovation  NACCE  Patrick Henry Community College 

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Inside the Entrepreneurial Method by Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, January 05, 2015

Ask Yourself- Can I Use Effectuation Now? 

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

This is part of a series of monthly blog articles from the work that is being done on engaging effectuation (the entrepreneurial method) in the 10 Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action Grantees from around the country. We wanted to share this information with the larger community of practice so you too can start integrating the entrepreneurial method in your department, your college, and your community.

The professional problem solving toolkit, relies on a strong causal skill set.  Strategy, budgeting, forecasting, and staffing processes are largely influenced by prediction and planning. 

Where does effectuation fit in?  It’s a complementary logic of non-predictive control.

When is it best applied?  Effectuation is best applied for innovation.  When approaching a new opportunity or problem to solve, as yourself the following questions:

1.     Is your goal uncertain or open-ended?

2.     Is there a lack of historical data available to you?

3.     Are you doing something you’ve never done before?

If your answer to at least two of these is “yes”, then this is a good opportunity to apply effectuation.

How can effectuation be assimilated into a causal environment? 

    1. Fully applied to new processes. 
    2. Integrated within existing causal processes. 

Both of these methods work, and will depend on the specific situation.   

Questions to consider when integrating the effectual mindset into existing processes

1.     What elements of effectuation “fit” best with your existing culture?  Consider incorporating these into existing formats. 

      • If you’re lacking strong planning processes, ask yourself if there are ways that you can apply these heuristics to give shape to processes (or lack thereof)?
      • If you have strong planning processes, can you use these as part of your means? 

2.     Are there opportunities to run effectuation in parallel with planning processes? 

      • Market research, budgeting, and partner engagement are common areas of opportunity

3.     What areas do you have control over in which you can experiment (relative to your affordable loss)?

4.     How can you use storytelling to drive comfort and familiarity with the effectual principles? 

5.     How can you engage stakeholders throughout your college to have them consider possible integration opportunities?  

Effectuation can be applied effectively in a causal environment. 

Integrate it?  Assimilate it?  Share it?  There are many different approaches. 

The best methods for your college are up to you, as the “institutional entrepreneur”, to decide.  

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Effectuation Ramp up at Ivy Tech Community College - Indiana

Posted By Steve E. Bryant, Thursday, December 18, 2014

Ivy Tech Community College is the only community college in Indiana and it's statewide network with over 15 regions and 23 main campuses.  We were a recent Coleman Foundation award winner at the 2014 NACCE Annual Meeting and our proposed project is to host a statewide Entrepreneurship Summit for all Ivy Tech faculty and staff engaged in entrepreneurship education at the College to grow it across the State of Indiana.

Our program is fairly new, as we first launched our ENTR program in the Fall of 2011 with only a few campuses offering them to students.  Since that time, we have launched 6 classes, created new certficates, finally received approval for financial aid for the certificates (whew) and offered 3 new on-line classes.  The number of students went from about 50 to over 160 in just a few semesters, but only 4-5 campuses are running the courses and we still are seeing low enrollments across most all of them.  This is painful since we know the program has the quality we want in the curriculum and the instructors, but the marketing of it has been challenging with a statewide audience.

It is our hope that a statewide ENTR summit in the Summer of 2015 will allow us to bring together internal stakeholders to identify challenges, strategies, actions and a plan for growing the program so our students can take their ideas and make them a reality upon graduation or when they are ready to launch their business.  We also want to ensure that external stakeholders have a say in how we structure our program and could be essential partners in marketing to other audiences.  We started talking about the Effectuation process during the Master Class at the NACCE conference and have since made some modifications as we reviewed the application we filed back in September. 

We think the Effectuation process will allow us to take some fuzzy goals and add more meat to the outcomes we want to make.  In talking with some external partners likely to be supportive of our efforts and participate in the program this summer, we learned that they were far more excited and engaged than we could have imagined.  Guessing this falls under the Crazy Quilt principal and they suggested we engage them earlier than the event to help plan and already want to help market our program across the State of Indiana as they pitch small business resources through the Office of Small Business and Entrepreneurship run by our Lt. Governor, Sue Elspermann. 

We were unsure where to start, but Sara Kiffen's guidance and recent blog post helped us understand when and where to start using the Effectuation techniques to aid our process.  We are just beginning, so not sure where it will all go, but we're excited to see where it all goes.  One of my personal goals is to show how our program can demonstrate new business startups across the State and in rural regions crying for something they can do to stop the tide of young people leaving for more urban pursuits.  We think our program has a lot of potential to show the way to reach down into the high schools and we are just getting to adding them to our stakeholder "hit list."

Anyhow, if you have suggestions or want to know how it is going, we'll try to keep the blog posts updated as we kick the door down into 2015...Gonna be quite a ride! 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, December 15, 2014

This month we are going to share in a conversation with the Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action grantees on a question that many of us deal with on our campuses every day. Please comment on this posting with your thoughts, ideas, and challenges.

“How do you talk about effectuation with internal and external stakeholders at your college?”

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Inside the Entrepreneurial Method by Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, December 08, 2014

Begin Where You Are

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

This is the first of a series of monthly blog articles from the work that is being done on engaging effectuation (the entrepreneurial method) in the 10 Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action Grantees from around the country. We wanted to share this information with the larger community of practice so you too can start engaging in conversations in your department, your college, and your community.

  1. When getting started, don’t look outward for “inspiration” or “vision”; look inward. 
    • Are you starting with a specific problem to solve?  If so, you want to develop outcomes that are solutions.  This provides some constraints that might help you prioritize next steps and possibilities. 
    • Are you starting with an idea to create additional value?  In this case, you might have more flexibility in terms of how you move forward.
  2. Be honest with yourself about your organizational culture.  Take a few moments to identify potential barriers / challenges.  Does effectual thinking fit intuitively with your existing organizational culture?  Or will it be a challenge for people to think in this way?  Is it a challenge for you, personally, to think in this way? 
  3. Understand what is non-negotiable.  This is especially important in institutional settings.  Understanding your boundaries will allow you more freedom to pivot when the opportunities arise. 
  4. Do you have a traditional planning process that you must / want to follow?  If so, before getting started, look for opportunities to either insert effectual thinking or operate in parallel.  This can be an effective way to get others internally on board with this approach. 
  5. Start Asking!  Get yourself and your teams to begin making asks, even on a small scale.  Practice is essential to building the competence and confidence that will be needed for true co-creation. 
  6. Track your successes and failures.  Decide now how you will record your experiences with this process – both the positives and negatives.  Since this method relies on interactions, consider capturing conversations. 

Effectuation is not an all or nothing approach.  Just as every business idea does not warrant an extensive business plan, not every entrepreneurial action needs to be effectual.  Expert entrepreneurs are proficient with using both causal and effectual thinking. They understand when and how to apply both mindsets with fluency.

I encourage you to comment on this blog to share your experiences implementing effectuation in your organization and any challenges you are facing.   

 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurship  innovation  NACCE  strategic planning 

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The Beginning of Entrepreneurship Across Disciplines at Middlesex Community College

Posted By Luciano Sappia, Sunday, November 30, 2014

Heading to NACCE 2014 Middlesex Community College (MCC) had a mission to kick start the “Expanding the MCC Entrepreneurial Ecosystem” project with the help of the NACCE community and the Coleman Foundation through the ECIA grant. This project is aimed at three of the Presidents for Entrepreneurship Pledge action steps:

  1. Create or Expand Internal & External Teams Dedicated to Entrepreneurship
  2.  Increase Entrepreneurs’ Engagement in Community Colleges
  3.  Create Buzz and Broad Exposure of your College’s Commitment to Entrepreneurship.

The core of our project has 3 main deliverables:

  •  Establishing a Cross-Disciplinary Internal Team of Faculty Dedicated to Broadening Student Understanding of and Engagement in Entrepreneurship Opportunities
  • Expanding the Entrepreneur-in Residence Program to a Network of Entrepreneurs-in-Residence
  • Sponsoring major entrepreneurship events each semester. (More information on the specifics of the project will be revealed in future posts as they get co-created!)

Upon our return, we began sowing the seeds for self-selection and co-creation. We did this by announcing in every encounter and official meeting the news of our success in Arizona during the conference. Our glee was meeting with equal amount of support from our fellow college community members as well as the external partners that began to get wind of our project moving forward.

One of the first things we did was to announce it during a Faculty and Staff Association meeting. A number of faculty and staff members contacted me after the meeting to offer their support and willingness to collaborate I have to admit I was not expecting so many members of the staff to be interested. I can’t wait to hear more about their ideas of how they can help shape this project from their corners of the institution.

That was the beginning of reaching out to our “Birds-in-hand”. We followed up with meetings with the Asst. Deans of every academic subdivision to identify and invite their faculty to raise their hands to become one of our entrepreneurship champions. We also engaged in conversation with our Professional Development office to begin creating a workshop series to develop the “entrepreneurship champions” understanding of the entrepreneurial method.

Taking these first steps in, not only announcing the project, but inviting the community to get involved in any capacity that feels comfortable to them and allowing for co-creation has proven very effective. You can almost feel the project changing from an Entrepreneurship Program initiative to a college wide collaborative initiative.

Lessons learned:

  • Everyone you meet is a good audience to share what your project is. You never know where you are going to get that connection, flash of inspiration, innovative thought that will steer the project in a better direction.
  • We don’t know what others are willing to do or give, so don’t limit your possibilities with questions that predefine the outcome.

Key takeaways:

  • Our colleges have many initiatives all the time that tend to live in silos. Break the silo, let go of the ownership of the project, let it be the college’s project.
  • Stay true to the “why” you are engaging your college in the project and let the “what” you do to get it accomplish be shaped by those who take an interest in fulfilling that “why”.

Tags:  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurship  innovation  Middlesex Community College  NACCE 

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Northeast State November Blog

Posted By Lynn Anderson, Friday, November 28, 2014

R. Lynn Anderson, CPA

Associate Professor, Business Technologies - Accounting

Northeast State Community College

rlanderson@northeaststate.edu

 

 

Center for Entrepreneurship

 

The proposal presented by Northeast State Community College at the NACCE 2014 Conference focused on the development of a Center for Entrepreneurship.  The Center will function as a highly interactive, collaborative learning center for customized entrepreneurial and leadership training.  Faculty, staff, local entrepreneurs and students will participate in the training.   The ECIA grant and assistance from the Coleman Foundation and NACCE encouraged us to expand our vision for the Center.  Future plans for the Center include making the Center mobile.

 

The Center will house:

 

·         a 3-D printer and associated software to enable inventors/innovators to produce prototypes of products.

 

·         top of the line tablets/laptops loaded with QuickBooks, business planning and Microsoft Office software

 

·         facilities for training, workshops and interaction.

 

The committee designated to develop the Center and outline its initial activities has undertaken the following tasks, using the "Bird in Hand":

 

·         Determine an appropriate, temporary location for the Center.  This location will be the Center's "home" until the permanent facilities are completed in the Advanced Technologies building, (occupancy expected in 2017)

 

·         Identify potential sources of additional funding

 

·         Identify potential contributors/workshop leaders

 

·         Identify campus resources - staff, contacts, expertise

 

·         Identify Center resource requirements in terms of staffing, supplemental equipment

 

·         Identify ways to market the Center

 

The formation of an Entrepreneur Club and holding informal "coffee clubs" in addition to the structured training and workshops will engage students in the development, staffing and utilization of the Center.

 

We are developing a contact list which includes local Chambers of Commerce, ACCELNow, Tennessee Small Business Development Center (TSBDC), Kingsport Office of Small Business Development Subcommittee (KOSBE) and other local groups and individuals.  We will also involve the Advisory Committees, the Northeast State Foundation, local entrepreneurs, faculty, staff and students who are potential contributors or users of  the Center.

 

Lessons Learned:

 

·         The formation of a Steering Committee which would include members from outside the immediate "campus community" will create buy-in from the region.

 

·         The resources available can extend well beyond those we first consider.  We need to keep building our "crazy quilt".

 

Key Takeaways:

 

·         Find creative ways to get others engaged and involved.  Entrepreneurship is not limited to the business community.

·         The Northeast State community has many talented individuals in various disciplines who have much to contribute.  We need to hone our "ask" to get them committed to the Center.

 

         

 

 

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