NEW COMPETITION - Student Entrepreneurship Challenge Applications are Due September 6!

NACCE 2019 Entrepreneurship 101 Track

Agenda

Monday, October 14
Breakout Session 1 from 9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

DEVELOPING AN ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET

Room: Cardiff

Level: Beginner

In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to immerse themselves with the design thinking approach as a way to foster an entrepreneurial mindset inside and outside the classroom and for students, faculty and staff.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the five main elements of the design thinking approach (empathy, problem identification, ideation, testing and prototyping)
  • Experiential learning through group exercises to apply design thinking approach both inside and outside the classroom.
  • Case studies of how entrepreneurial mindset can be integrated into addressing local community challenges

ROMI BHATIA, Executive Director, The Idea Center, Miami Dade College (FL) 

GUSTAVO GRANDE, Entrepreneurship Program Manager, The Idea Center, Miami Dade College (FL) 


TELLING YOUR STORY - TELLING THEIR STORY

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Intermediate

Story telling is one of the oldest teaching and learning methods in Western Civilization. It allows students' an opportunity to immerse themselves mentally into a situation. Thus, engaging them while implanting a visual understanding of what may be complex theories or ambiguous topics. Today "Cases" and "Case Studies" play a similar role in healthcare, law and business education.

However, simpler forms and other techniques for including rich contextual stories can be used as a planned learning activity or a spontaneous event; that will break up a learning routine so the student stays connected and not drifting mentally. Students create their own stories as part of many of the learning activities, which further engages them.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the basic theory supporting story telling as a learning methodology.
  • Apply techniques for story telling in various learning environments.
  • Evaluate the usefulness of various story telling techniques in various learning environments.

ANTHONY E. BAKER, PhD, Assistant Professor, Anne Arundel Community College, MD


RESILIENCE:  THE GAME CHANGER FOR STUDENTS, ENTREPRENEURS AND EMPLOYEES

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Beginner

Resilience is one of the most important factors that leads to success and well being.  Resilient people find solutions to problems, have excellent coping skills and turn difficult experiences into triumphs. What makes some people more resilient than others? Best practices and proven techniques will be shared that can help anyone become more resilient even in the most stressful times. Learn about the GrOW curriculum and how its focus on gratitude, positivity and resilience techniques can change lives. Discover how this curriculum can be implemented at your school and be used in versatile ways for student success, non-credit opportunities, community education, business and industry training and employee development.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define Resilience and how it helps solve problems.
  • Share best practices and proven techniques.
  • Learn about the GrOW curriculum and how it could be implemented into student success, non-credit opportunities, community education, business and industry training and employee development.

JILENE HUIZENGA, Faculty Director/Center For Entrepreneurship, Madison College, WI

JODI GOLDBECK, Instructor, Madison College, WI

KRISTIN GEBHARDT, Academic Director, Madison College, WI


SUCCESSFUL INTEGRATION OF CREDIT/NON-CREDIT ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAMS

Room: Crystal Cove

Level: Intermediate

Midlands Technical College has redesigned/implemented a new approach to entrepreneurship education, integrating both for-credit courseware (ENT certificate) and not-for-credit courseware (CEU's) in seamless offerings to satisfy a broader range of student outcomes and career objectives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Determining critical components of ENT certificate, allowing for maximum utility across a wide range of career tracks.
  • Developing Kauffman FastTrac materials as base of Business Opportunity Analysis course, used a capstone course for the ENT Certificate.
  • Methodology for combining credit/non-credit students in classes for enhanced scheduling flexibility and student application.

TOM LEDBETTER, Associate Vice Provost/Entrepreneurship & Educational Support, Midlands Technical College, SC

LEE HUNT, Program Director/Marketing & Management, Midlands Technical College, SC


Breakout Session 2 from 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

THE SUCCESS AND CHALLENGES OF USING START-IT-UP IN ENTREPRENEURIAL CLUB

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Beginner

Are you wondering, what is Start-it-Up? Is Start-it-Up good for my students’ extracurricular activity? Is Start-it-Up better for the classroom or for an extracurricular club? What do students like about Start-it-Up? What do students dislike about Start-it-Up? Does it work? Is it efficient?

Bakersfield College (BC) Entrepreneurial Club is a cross-departmental organization that implements Start-it-Up as part of the club’s activities. Start-it-Up is the only end-to-end scalable mobile technology platform designed to guide students in launching small businesses. Start-it-Up claims to increase rate of business launch, retention, and growth, but the true question is, how efficient is the program to use with students. In this presentation, we will interact with some of the features in Start-it-Up while discussing the efficiency of the program as an extracurricular activity. Although Start-it-Up has great benefits to entrepreneurs, it also has challenges that should be considered before implementation. Please join us as we go through the success and challenges of using Start-it-Up.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to incorporate Start-it-Up in their entrepreneurial environment.
  • Participants will be able to attract new and potential students from different departments into the Start-it-Up entrepreneurship program.
  • Participants will be able to understand the success and challenges of implementing Start-it-Up.

RUDY MENJIVAR, Professor, Bakersfield College, CA

GAYLE RICHARDSON, Bakersfield College, CA

VALERIE ROBINSON, Bakersfield College, CA


WHO OWNS THE GREENHOUSE? GROWING ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEMS ON YOUR CAMPUS

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Beginner

Entrepreneurial Ecosystems require fresh perspectives, nurturing, and support in order to grow on any campus. We learned this early in our entrepreneurial adventures when, with 46 graduates of our Agricultural Entrepreneurship Certificate Program, we started looking at our abandoned Greenhouse with new eyes.  An Agri-Business incubator was born and, now, our Agricultural Entrepreneurs have a reasonably priced place to start their businesses surrounded by the support and networking resources needed for success. Everyone owns our Greenhouse!

Our session will challenge attendees to discover THEIR campus’ Greenhouse.  It will explore the important role entrepreneurial mindsets play in discovering underutilized resources and creating a road map for how the resource can add value. Our break out activity, will identify how entrepreneurial mindsets drive the transformation of underutilized resources into revenue generating ecosystems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the Bird in the Hand/Asset Mapping process to develop their underutilized assets to generate their own entrepreneurial ecosystems.
  • Participants will learn the critical role entrepreneurial mindsets play in shifting the paradigms of traditional resource uses and revealing opportunities for maximum efficacy of their resources.
  • Participants will gain a better understand of the importance of collaboration between their college, small business owners, and community members as well as discovering the energies a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem generates on their campus which translates to productivity improvements.

JERRY EDMONDS, Dean, Workforce & Economic Development, Halifax Community College, NC

KELLY BARBER, Director, Small Business Center, Halifax Community College, NC


THE NITTY GRITTY OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP- MENTAL HEALTH, CREATIVITY AND DISCOVERY THROUGH NONCREDIT

Room: Crystal Cove

Level: Intermediate

I am currently working on a PH.D in clinical psychology, with a focus in my dissertation on Entrepreneurial mindsets and mental health disorders, the benefits of the entrepreneurial mindset for mental health and wellbeing, brain health and for our college students. 1 in 4 college students suffer from mental health, which creates challenges for them in life and in college, affecting their overall success and exacerbating their drop out rate. We need to promote the benefits of entrepreneurial mindsets, in our community colleges and within the mental health and sciences communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Benefits of oncredit programming.
  • How to work with students and students with mental health issues/disorders, to bring out their strengths.
  • How to start a Noncredit Entrepreneurial program.

KIM FREEZE, Director Noncredit, Community and Contract Education, Adjunct Psychology Professor, College of the Siskiyous, CA

KARLI HUNTLEY, Adjunct Instructor, Entrepreneur, Student, College of Siskiyous, CA


Breakout Session 3 from 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

CONNECTING WITH YOUR COMMUNITY

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Intermediate

During this interactive session, we will discuss ways to connect with our community.  We offer a great deal of support and resources to entrepreneurs.  We will explore best practices of reaching those who need our support and organizations with whom we should partner.  Everyone will leave with a strategy specific to their community.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore best practices.
  • Perform needs assessment.
  • Create a strategy.

ALLAN YOUNGER, Director, Small Business Center, Forsyth Technical Community College, NC


IMAKE (INMATES MAKE), BEHAVIOR CHANGE THROUGH ENGINEERING PROGRAMS

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Advanced

More info coming soon...

FARSHID MIRZAEI, Assistant Professor, Drafting, Norco College, CA


TAKING A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO CREATING AN ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET

Room: Crystal Cove

Level:  Beginner

At Chippewa Valley Technical College, we have developed a holistic approach to connecting an entrepreneurial culture across the  School of Business Division with employees, credit courses, partnerships with national entrepreneurial organizations and non-credit seminars and training.

From these efforts, we have experienced increased enrollment, entrepreneurs launching new businesses in our community and employees developing innovative ideas to support our College's mission and vision.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what types of activities could benefit your institution to support entrepreneurism.
  • Develop strategies that will connect students to relevant and applied learning as it relates to entrepreneurism.
  • Hear from local entrepreneurs and the impact the program and activities have had on them personally.
  • Learn how we established a consistent connection between One Million Cups and our program curriculum.

LISA ARENDT, Director, School of Business, Chippewa Valley Technical College, WI

BEN ZUGAY, Program Director - Entrepreneurship Program, Chippewa Valley Technical College, WI


LESSONS LEARNED: LAUNCHING CCSF'S CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION

Room: Copper Cove

Level:  Beginner

The purpose of this interactive session is to share the startup story of City College of San Francisco’a Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and how we utilize the entrepreneurial skills we teach our students to become successful education entrepreneurs. From securing funding to building community to creating certificates, we will highlight the steps we took to develop high impact programs, increase social media marketing, educate inmates, get buy in, and create an interdisciplinary team of faculty, department chairs, staff, and administrators to collaborate on making this Center the premier entrepreneurship resource center in San Francisco.

More importantly, we hope to inspire the audience to adopt an intrapreneurial mindset to be visionary thinkers and strategic disruptors in their effort to create something new from scratch within their work environment/organization. We will invite the audience to share success stories and lessons learned from mistakes in our collective effort to redefine our sense of what is possible. Several themes will be highlighted, such as bootstrapping, failing forward, resiliency, design thinking, focusing on what matters, and navigating political landscape. Key takeaway is the “invent as you go approach”to emphasize the importance of taking action without overanalyzing situations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the traits and characteristics of an entrepreneur in higher education.
  • Increase understanding of the importance of an intrapreneurial mindset to effect change.
  • Generate ideas and opportunities to pursue as an education entrepreneur.

GEISCE LY, Dean, School of Business, Fashion & Culinary Arts, City College of San Francisco, CA

VIVIAN FAUSTINO-PULLMAN, Faculty and Program Lead, Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, City College of San Francisco, CA


Breakout Session 4 from 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

STRENGTHEN PATHWAYS FROM ASSOCIATE TO BACHELORS THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS AROUND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Intermediate

This presentation will explore the DifferenceMaker program created by UMass Lowell (UML), as well as a partnership with Middlesex Community College (MCC). DifferenceMaker is a UML campus-wide program that engages students of all majors in creative problem solving, innovation and entrepreneurship. Students work in teams to identify problems they care about. Then, students engage in a workshop series, where they explore the opportunity, create a business model, and generate solutions. Activities culminate at the $50K Idea Challenge, where teams pitch to win funding for their idea.

The partnership between UML and MCC embraces design thinking, and gives students the needed tools to move through the entrepreneurial process, from idea generation to launch. Winning teams at MCC’s Idea Competition have the opportunity to pitch at the UML DifferenceMaker $50K Idea Challenge. This partnership provides MCC students with the same programming that freshman and sophomore business students at UML are required to take, and helps them assimilate better upon transfer. MCC also developed a 1-credit coursework that pairs with this programming and transfers to UMass Lowell. During this presentation, we will review activities, discuss the $50K Idea Challenge, and share student successes and challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand DifferenceMaker programming.
  • Identify ways to implement similar partnerships.
  • Describe the value of university and community college partnerships around entrepreneurship and how administrators garner resources and support this type of initiative.

STACIE HARGIS, Associate Professor, Middlesex Community College, MA

JUDITH HOGAN, Dean of Business, Legal Studies, and Public Service Division, Middlesex Community College, MA

HOLLY BUTLER, Entrepreneurial Initiatives Program Director, DifferenceMaker, Middlesex Community College; University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA


BOOTSTRAPPING: STARTING FROM ZERO

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Intermediate

Bootstrapping is as old as entrepreneurship.  It was the go-to start-up strategy long before Shark Tank and VC-driven unicorns captured our imaginations.  It’s also about much more than “starting with nothing”. Let’s revisit how to bootstrap companies and why it’s important to mainstream entrepreneurs as well as economically challenged communities.

Understanding bootstrapping and mitigation of financial and market risk provides students with ways to build without seeking traditional investment, provides greater opportunity for student self-empowerment, economic empowerment and control over destiny.

Learning Objectives:

  • Bootstrapping is, by definition, market focused. The approach forces entrepreneurs to prioritize their activities that lead to the first and subsequent sales, generally as soon as possible, minimizing efforts and expenses that don’t focus on that objective. Entrepreneurs become focused on getting in front of customers and having the critical sales conversations as soon as possible, gaining real-world feedback and adapting their solutions to solve real customer problems, rather than perceived ones.
  • Bootstrapping is a creative mindset and business approach. Entrepreneurs must be resourceful, learning to partner, beg, borrow (not steal), seek donations of equipment and resources, truly taking on the mantra of “being scrappy”.
  • Bootstrapping leads to better resource management, better cash flow management, more resilient companies, and more ownership for the entrepreneur. If investment is later sought, bootstrapped companies are better investment candidates; entrepreneurs will better understand financing alternatives, their potential impact and be in a better position to negotiate advantageous terms.

ROB NEWMAN, Instructor, Entrepreneurship, Business & Aviation, Glendale Community College, CA

THOMAS S. PACCIORETTI, Assistant Professor, Entrepreneurship, Santa Monica College, CA


STARTUP STRATEGIES - START HERE AND NOW WITH WHAT YOU HAVE

Room: Crystal Cove

Level: Beginner

This presentation is based on the first effectuation principal “Bird in the hand” from Professor Saras Sarasvathy’s Effectuation Theory of Entrepreneurship. When coaching new entrepreneurs one of the initial steps is identifying whether or not they can turn their passion, skill or dream into a viable business. The second step is educating the entrepreneur on how to pursue their objective without first acquiring a loan. Using the first effectuation principal “Bird in the hand” is how both of these steps are accomplished.

Bird in the hand emphasizes using the resources that are available in the here and now. Helping the entrepreneur Identify and implement what micro steps are required to create and test a product will give them insight into the market before prematurely investing in an idea. This workshop outlines a process and emphasizes generating revenue while proving and refining the concept. Using the Effectuation Theory of Entrepreneurship to guide action steps that generate revenue increases the likelihood of an entrepreneur’s success and ability to grow without the immediate burden of loan debt.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop knowledge on how to assess business opportunities and an in-depth understanding of how to determine small starting steps that require little or no additional funding.
  • Develop knowledge of strategies necessary to bring new products and services to market that can be used to minimize uncertainties in the early stages of the entrepreneurial process.
  • Understand the Principals of Effectuation and its impact on startup success.

ELENA GANN, Business Coach - Start up Strategist, Kansas City Kansas Community College, KS

TOI HERSHMAN, Regional Coordinator, Entre Ed


Tuesday, October 15
Breakout Session 5 from 9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

FREE YOURSELF FROM THE TEXTBOOK. TEACH TO OBJECTIVES USING OER

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Beginner

Would you like all of your students to have the course content on the first day of class? Would you like to make your work as an instructor be a powerful force for making learning equitable in your community? How about breaking away from the traditional textbook structure and focusing your student learning on objectives? You’ve come to the right presentation!

This presentation will start with a brief overview of the definition of Open Educational Resources (OER), including how Creative Commons licensing works. We will then review the best repositories for searching business course content, including content chapters, course modules, slides, quizzes and instructor lesson plans. Next, learn how adopting OER content modules, rather than textbooks, can help you focus on teaching to objectives. Using smart phones, laptops or tablets you can examine examples of OER content including: business modeling, financial projections, sales planning, marketing mix, negotiations, time management and more. Finally, the presentation will allow a question and answer from OER experts that have gone through the struggles and triumphs of adopting OER for their business programs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what OER is and how Creative Commons licensing can free traditional copyright restrictions.
  • Gain proficiency in searching for OER business content.
  • Learn how to adopt OER resources that focus on teaching to student learning objectives.

MATTHEW RIVALDI, MBA, Faculty Instructor, San Diego Continuing Education, CA

AARON IFFLAND, PhD, Faculty Instructor, San Diego Continuing Education, CA


Breakout Session 6 from 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

THE FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS MODEL DESIGN

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Beginner

An important part of creating a successful business is ensuring the key building blocks come together into a coherent business model. With technology and the internet making possible so many ways to sell a product, choosing the right business model can be a daunting task. The Business Model Canvas has become a favorite tool for entrepreneurs around the world to help find the best way to monetize their business idea. In this session, participants will learn about the Business Model Canvas, the key concepts in business model design, and tools to assess the viability of a business model based on 7 dimensions.

Participants will work in teams to create a business model for a case study and assess each other’s ideas using the tools presented. The session will include examples of how the Business Model Canvas is being used at various colleges throughout the Inland Empire, and will close with a discussion of best practices when teaching students and entrepreneurs to use the Business Model Canvas for their own businesses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what the Business Model Canvas is and the 9 building blocks that are a part of the canvas.
  • Understand how to assess whether a business idea is viable and ways to fix it if its not.
  • Learn best practices in teaching the Business Model Canvas or implementing it into an entrepreneurship curriculum.

ANA GREIF, Program Manager, Pima Community College, AZ

LISA KIPLINGER-KENNEDY, DSN Business and Entrepreneurship, Inland Empire Desert Regional Consortium, CA


Breakout Session 7 from 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

LEARNING TO CONQUER COMMUNITY COLLABORATIONS: ENGAGING STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Beginner

How do you increase your entrepreneurial programming and outreach with a limited staff and budget? The answer is collaborations! Collaborating across campus departments and involving your community leaders will allow your department to work “smarter, not harder,” while meeting students where they are physically and scholastically. Lorain County Community College’s NEO LaunchNET Department provides programming and workshops both on-campus and off, allowing us to strengthen ties to local businesses and non-profits within our community. We will share with you how we modify our basic programming message to each group, so the presentation is unique, yet not “created from scratch” each time. You will also learn our methods for forming a local entrepreneurial ecosystem, as well as examples of our favorite activities for entrepreneurial thinking, research and team building. If that’s not enough, learn how to engage students of all ages with Oreos!

Learning Objectives:

  • Methodology to implement community-based programming
  • Creating a timeline for engaging entrepreneurship programming
  • Creating a local entrepreneurial ecosystem

MATT POYLE, Program Coordinator, Lorain County Community College (OH)

JANICE LAPINA, Director of Continuing Education and Director, NEO LaunchNET, Lorain County Community College (OH)


HACKATHON - ENTREPRENEURSHIP, INQUIRY BASED LEARNING AND CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Beginner

This presentation will discuss lessons learned and opportunities for students using a Hackathon Competition.  A Hackathon is a three day competition where teams are asked to develop proposals utilizing digital story telling techniques to unearth untold stories of Kern County.  Digital storytelling is a process by which people share their life stories. It represents the modern extension of the ancient art of storytelling, now interwoven with digitized still and moving images as well as sound. All teams will be given a maximum hypothetical budget of $25,000.00 to initiate their project idea.  More information about budget proposals will be discussed at the Hackathon event.  Student teams will be judged on the following criteria:  pitch, plan, delivery, budget, etc.  All team members will receive a Digital Badge and SWAG. The top three projects will have an opportunity to receive funding to implement concepts.

Using an interdisciplinary approach, the Hackathon organizer team is composed of a combination of expertise and faculty from the following fields: computer science, communications, public health, business and history.  Students also play a key role the competition design and day.  This presentation will discuss the lessons learned from the team and opportunities for entrepreneurship, inquiry based learning and alignment to the curriculum.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key components of a Hackathon competition.
  • identify best practices for a Hackathon competition.
  • Discuss strategies for implementation of entrepreneurship concepts within the curriculum.

SARAH BARON, Professor, Bakersfield College, CA

EDWARD RANGEL, Associate Professor, Bakersfield College, CA


START WITH MINDSET!

Room: Crystal Cove

Level: Beginner

Beginning and growing an entrepreneurship program on a community college campus is a daunting task.  Even the most committed and influential faculty members can struggle to increase enrollment in their programs.  A major cause of this problem is that most students don’t self-identify as an entrepreneur, and those that do most likely are attending the college to gain technical skills in their area of interest versus learning about the entrepreneurial process.

This reality leads to programs that struggle to meet minimum class sizes and eventual program failure.  The solution lies is taking the focus outside of the business department (where entrepreneurship programs normally find themselves) and reaching out to cross-disciplinary faculty, administrators and students.

In reaching out, entrepreneurship faculty must be able to explain how the mindset and methods of entrepreneurs are valuable to all students, no matter their chosen path.   By doing so, students, supportive faculty members, and administrators can be found when they see they value of the lessons of entrepreneurship to learners within their various programs.  CTE and arts programs are especially drawn in by this message. 

In this session, participants will first come to understand the critical elements of the entrepreneurial mindset and why they translate and connect to all students regardless of their chosen major.  Then those in attendance will participate in an interactive exercise where they brainstorm and begin to formulate ways where they can connect with others more broadly across their colleges in order to grow their respective entrepreneurship programs.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the entrepreneurial mindset as an empowerment mechanism whereby any student can benefit
  • Become familiar with examples of where a cross-curricular process by entrepreneurship faculty has allowed for growth of their programs.
  • Develop their own ideas for energizing and growing their programs by first focusing on the entrepreneurial mindset.

GARY SCHOENIGER, Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative, OH

ROB HERNDON, Vice President, Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative, OH

RAJA BHATTACHARYA, Founding Director of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Northampton Community College, PA


ALEXA, WHAT'S TODAY'S LESSON?

Room: Copper Cove

Level: Beginner

Voicefirst technology is changing the way we learn, interact, entertain and engage.  Amazon, and its voice assist ecosystem, provides a platform that anybody can use as a listener, participant or producer.  While presenter David Gaudet uses voice as an entrepreneur himself, to tell stories and improve his own thought leadership stature, he also uses it as an educational tool and course project.    

In this interactive session, Gaudet, a producer of over 200 Alexa Flash Briefings, demonstrates how to get started, as well as the omni-applicability of voice assist in and out of the classroom.  Importantly, the session also makes a case for why student entrepreneurs must also now be thinking about sonic-personal branding.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the basics of Alexa Flash Briefings as a teaching and learning tool.
  • Complete the process of setting up an Amazon Developer account.
  • Begin creating their own personalized Alexa Flash Briefing.

DAVID GAUDET, Instructor, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Canada


Breakout Session 8 from 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

BACCC REGIONAL JOINT VENTURE - INTEGRATING ENTREPRENEURSHIP INTO MAKERSPACES

Room: Diamond Cove

Level: Intermediate

Our focus is on the INTEGRATION of entrepreneurial skills, business development information and technical assistance to Makerspace students in business development to produce completions and earnings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gather and develop resources on how to INTEGRATE business skills into learning outcomes and Makerspace projects.
  • Faculty have project ideas, samples and materials to understand and practice Entrepreneurship in the Makerspace learning environment.
  • Data on “employment” and “wages” are not available for the entrepreneur/self employed. Other hand-gathered metrics will be collected to identify successful strategies..

JIM CORDEIRO, Makerspace Director, College of Marin, CA


VIEWING THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS THROUGH AND AN INDIGENOUS LENS

Room: Emerald Cove

Level: Intermediate

The Business Model Canvas (BMC) is a tool widely used to assist entrepreneurs in developing their business concepts.  Se how, when viewed through an indigenous lens, the BMC can connect on a more meaningful and relevant level with aspiring entrepreneurs in the classroom and beyond.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define Cultural Entrepreneurship.
  • Learn how the Business Model Canvas can be adapted when using an Indigenous lens
  • Create activities that engage entrepreneurial students.

DIRK SOMA, Assistant Professor, Business Program Coordinator, Kauai Community College, HI